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Hammer Horror Appreciation Thread!

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  • #31
    Originally posted by monwobobbo View Post
    i've gotta mention that there are 2 more films in the series that really don't get much mention. BRIDES OF DRACULA (yeah i know dracula isn't in it ) and LEGEND OF THE 7 GOLDEN VAMPIRES. (a very cool co prodution with the Shaw BRos)
    Yeah, they are the "Friday the 13ths" of the Hammer Series of films(they are considered cannon to the earlier Christopher Lee Dracula's).
    Be careful what you wish for...Eric Curto

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    • #32
      I have all but AD 1972, all are great, for those that don't have them def. pick it up.

      My DVD's/Blu's

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      • #33
        Originally posted by travisbickle View Post
        I have all but AD 1972, all are great, for those that don't have them def. pick it up.
        My first Hammer Dracula film was Dracula A.D 1972, when I was 8. My second was Horror of Dracula and than Dracula: Princce of Darkness.
        Frankenstein and The Monster From Hell, was my first Hammer Frankenstein, than Evil of Frankenstein, than Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed.
        Be careful what you wish for...Eric Curto

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        • #34
          Originally posted by myerspinheadfan View Post
          My first Hammer Dracula film was Dracula A.D 1972, when I was 8. My second was Horror of Dracula and than Dracula: Princce of Darkness.
          Frankenstein and The Monster From Hell, was my first Hammer Frankenstein, than Evil of Frankenstein, than Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed.
          Months ago I picked up the Warner versions of Dracula has risen from the Grave and Taste the Blood of Dracula. All you get for extras are trailers, but the movie quality is pretty fucking sweet.

          From what I've heard A.D 1972 would be the runt of the litter in that collection, but as I haven't seen it, all I can rely on are reviews. And they aren't 100% accurate anyway, so what do other real horror fans think?
          Drink, si! Loco, si! But I tell you true... - Town Drunk: Imboca, Spain

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Blood_n_Gutz_DownUnder View Post
            From what I've heard A.D 1972 would be the runt of the litter in that collection, but as I haven't seen it, all I can rely on are reviews. And they aren't 100% accurate anyway, so what do other real horror fans think?
            That's probably accurate. I liked the movie for its cheese factor, but in reality it featured a seven minute scene where all these young seventies tuffs go-go danced their way through this party and I had no idea what relevance it had. Still, the movie is entertaining, but Dracula seemed to die more and more easily as the movies went on. If you find AD for a good price, I wouldn't feel bad about buying it but don't spend too much.

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            • #36
              At Last! At Long Last!

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              • #37
                Which Hammer series is better... Frankenstein or Dracula?

                I haven't seen much Hammer, in fact I have only seen The Curse of Frankenstein, which I enjoyed. So I was wondering which of their series is better The Frankenstein series or Dracula series? The one that gets the most posative feedback will be the one I check out first, then I'll move on to the other. Also, what non Dracula/Frankenstein Hammer films should I check out?

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                • #38
                  Both are good series IMO. They both were made by Hammer's "A" list filmmakers: Fisher, Ward Baker, Sangster behind the camera and Cushing and Lee in front. It's hard to go wrong when all those guys are working together, if you have any kind of appreciation for classic horror of that era.

                  If forced to choose, I'd slightly lean towards the Dracula series - though it goes noticeably downhill when updating to modern (well, early 70's) time. Though Hammer in general was running down in the 70's. Starting of course with Horror of Dracula. Though I'd have no bones with anyone suggesting the Frankenstein movies. Just try to watch the series in order - many follow from the plot of the previous one, and often the prologue will be the climax of the preceeding movie (which kind of spoils it if you haven't seen it).

                  There have been loads of great Hammer movies outside those series. Some of my favorites include "Curse of the Werewolf", "The Devil Rides Out", and "Quatermass and the Pit".

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                  • #39
                    Thanks for the warning of not watching them out of order, because I have Taste the Blood of Dracula in a double feature with The Curse of Frankenstein, and probably would've watched it without seeing the ones that came before it if you didn't say that.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Nightmare View Post
                      Thanks for the warning of not watching them out of order, because I have Taste the Blood of Dracula in a double feature with The Curse of Frankenstein, and probably would've watched it without seeing the ones that came before it if you didn't say that.
                      Curse of Frankenstein of the 1st of the series, so that's safe to watch. You might as well go for it, seeing as you have the DVD and all. EDIT - oops, missed that you saw this already. duh

                      Taste the Blood is one of those that does begin with the ending of the preceeding movie, Dracula Has Risen. Yeah, you know Dracula gets "killed" every movie, and somehow manages to come back for the next. But the fun, at least for me, is seeing how it plays out.
                      Last edited by ZantiMisfit; 01-08-2008, 03:39 PM.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by ZantiMisfit View Post
                        Both are good series IMO. They both were made by Hammer's "A" list filmmakers: Fisher, Ward Baker, Sangster behind the camera and Cushing and Lee in front. It's hard to go wrong when all those guys are working together, if you have any kind of appreciation for classic horror of that era.

                        If forced to choose, I'd slightly lean towards the Dracula series - though it goes noticeably downhill when updating to modern (well, early 70's) time. Though Hammer in general was running down in the 70's. Starting of course with Horror of Dracula. Though I'd have no bones with anyone suggesting the Frankenstein movies. Just try to watch the series in order - many follow from the plot of the previous one, and often the prologue will be the climax of the preceeding movie (which kind of spoils it if you haven't seen it).

                        There have been loads of great Hammer movies outside those series. Some of my favorites include "Curse of the Werewolf", "The Devil Rides Out", and "Quatermass and the Pit".
                        Damn, man.

                        You said exactly what I was going to.

                        From giving props to TF, RWB & TF, to recommending the Dracula series and not having a problem with the FRANKENSTEINs, all the way to recommending THE DEVIL RIDES OUT & QUATERMASS & THE PIT (CURSE... is good too, just didn't think of it).

                        Stop stealing my thoughts, damn you!

                        Oh, and as far as continuity goes, what Zanti said is mostly right, but the DRACULA series basically restarts again with SCARS OF DRACULA. For some weird reason the prologue with Van Helsing & Drac takes place before they meet in HORROR OF DRACULA.

                        Although I personally prefer the DRACULA series, the FRANKENSTEINs are good too, and also recommended.

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                        • #42
                          Well, I'm coming in from the other side then, 'cuz I prefer the Frankenstein series. Partial to Cushing's desperate and breathy performance as what's basically the Mirror-universe Sherlock Holmes.

                          To me, the Dracula films miss the opportunity to make Dracula a real antihero, reducing him to a hissing cameo toward the end. At a younger age, I thought Dracula AD 1972 and Satanic Rites of Dracula completely botched an opportunity to raise Dracula to the level of the supervillain he was in the Marvel comics of that time.
                          Face it sucka, we're thieves and we're bad guys, that's exactly what we are!
                          - Ken (Peter) Foree, Dawn of the Dead

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                          • #43
                            Also, and these two aren't Hammer productions but are closely related...

                            The House That Dripped Blood and Creeping Flesh star both Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing among others and are fantastic. They have the same feel as the Horror pictures and when I'm recommending a film to introduce someone into this sub-genre, I steer them toward Creeping Flesh. This is one of Lee and Cushing's better performances, which carries multiple sub-plots and approaches the idea of madness from an intellectual point of view. In my opinion it's one of the more approachable English gothic horror movies.

                            And to agree with Zanti, the Devil Rides Out is a barrel of monkeys as well.

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                            • #44
                              I'll echo the sentiments of everyone else here. You can't go wrong with either series. I lean towards the Dracula series myself and own them all. Dracula Prince of Darkness and Scars of Dracula can be somewhat pricey to come by but worth picking up. A couple of other Hammer vampire films to see is The Vampire Lovers and Brides of Dracula. Others that were mentioned are highly recommended as well.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by commandoZ View Post
                                To me, the Dracula films miss the opportunity to make Dracula a real antihero, reducing him to a hissing cameo toward the end. At a younger age, I thought Dracula AD 1972 and Satanic Rites of Dracula completely botched an opportunity to raise Dracula to the level of the supervillain he was in the Marvel comics of that time.
                                While I don't necessarily agree that Hammer should have made Dracula an anti-hero, I do agree with the second part of your statement. I liked Dracula AD 1972 and Satanic Rites, but both movies continued to portray Dracula's powers as diminishing. In Horror of Dracula he was a bad ass, but as time went on, he seemed to get killed easier and easier. I realize by then they were focusing on different themes, but Dracula AD 1972 in particular focused too much on the malcontents that raised him. The point is the fight between Cushing and Lee, and by the time they got to the showdown, there wasn't much time for a fitting battle back and forth. He absolutely should have been a Supervillian, but I think Hammer started to lose their focus.

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