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  • #31
    Originally posted by thomasjarvis
    Thanks, and I will.

    I was just thinking...I should have titled this thread "The Official Dario Argento Appreciation Thread". I would really like to see this thread continue on, but with more spirited ruminations on the man and his art from all the lingering EuroHorror buffs and whomever else happens to put their two cents in. The list is essential, and it's why I posted the thread in the first place, but it seems that people somehow feel restricted by the subject matter. It's not just about the links, its a thread for discussing all things Argento related. Same goes with the Fulci thread, the lists are just a sort of starting-off point.
    I'm a fan of his work and that's only in the past couple of years. I never had a problem with him in the past but it hasn't been until recently that I was able to take everything all in. I went on a Dario DVD binge not too long ago and since his stuff is getting some really gold DVD treatment it's been a blast having Argento marathons.
    "I have love in me the likes of which you can scarcely imagine and rage the likes of which you would not believe. If I cannot satisfy the one, I will indulge the other."

    - Frankenstein's Monster.

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by Severn
      I'm a fan of his work and that's only in the past couple of years. I never had a problem with him in the past but it hasn't been until recently that I was able to take everything all in. I went on a Dario DVD binge not too long ago and since his stuff is getting some really gold DVD treatment it's been a blast having Argento marathons.
      I bet that has been a blast, Severn.

      Yea, I first started getting into Dario when I was a pre-teen, back in '88-89. Fangoria had put out that 100th Issue Anniversay Special, with an overview of the most significant horror film milestones for each decade. I remember reading the chapter on the 1970's, and it mentioned this strange Italian director named Argento who kept turning out blood-soaked thrillers with an artistic edge...the titles intreiged me: "Bird With the Crystal Plummage", "Cat 'O Nine Tails", "Four Flies On Grey Velvet" and "Deep Red"...those are some awfully damn interesting movie titles, they sounded so classy and almost esoteric, very un-American, unorthodox sounding.

      The artical went on to state how Argento next turned his sights towards nightmarish, "phantasmagoric" and supernaturally themed horror with 1977's "Suspiria". When I read the artical on Horror In the 80's, I found out that he followed up "Suspiria" with it's sequel "Inferno" before moving on to "Tenebrae", "Phenomena" and "Opera". I loved how he went from complicated, multiple worded animal and insect oriented titles to simple one-word titles that often ended with the letter "A" ('Suspiria', 'Phenomena', 'Opera', etc).

      So, at that point over fifteeen years ago, I had yet to even see a single one of his films, but the descriptions of his style, the mysterious titles of his films, and the overall vibe I got from reading about the man and his movies, had me postively captivated by the idea of checking out the man's contributions to cinematic horror film history.

      The artical explained how most of his films were released on home video in butchered form and retitled for the mass American marketplace, unfortunatley. Some of his films, I also learned at that time, had never recieved a theatrical or even home video release (at that time). So, intrieged by the cryptic Argento clues given me by those Fango articals, I set about tracking down as many Argento related videos as I could possibly get my hands on.

      The first ones I found at a local rental shop were the documentary entitled "Dario Argento's World of Horror"; directed by 'Dellamorte Dellamore' (aka 'The Cemetery Man') helmer Michele Soavi, and the Argento produced "Demons".

      The documentary was like a revelation...it truly blew my mind, seeing all those montage sequences combining the most surreal and nightmarish scenes from his films. I had never seen anything like that stuff before. It opened my mind to the boundless possibilities of the visual medium that is film, and exposed me to juxtopositions of imagery combined with narrative ideas that were quite outside the norm of mainstream filmmaking. Watching those dreamlike sequences simulateously fascinated me and filled me with a rush of arenaline the likes of which I'd rarely, if ever, previously experienced from merely watching a video!

      My appetite wetted, soon I had managed to track down a copy of "Suspiria" from a local supermarket. Those first few scenes...oh man... With that eerie lullabye, the pouring rain, the psychedelic colors at the airport and inside the taxi, the fairytale quality of the ghostly white forrest seen during Susie's midnight journey through the thunderstorm, the first glimpse of the archetectual marvel that is the dance acadamy...Followed by what one might legitimately deem the most magnificently photographed murder sequence ever put to celluloid!

      That did it, from then on I was a hardcore Argento-phile. Within the next few months in 1989 and on into 1990, I was thilled by the hallucinatory sequences and the bug's eye view shots from the truncutted version of 'Phenomena' known as "Creepers", followed by my discoveries of '"Inferno" and "Tenebrae" (which had been severely cut and retitled "Unsane" for the the U.S. home video market). Lastly, I tracked down his 80's masterpiece 'Opera' which had been retitled "Terror At the Opera", and the Argento produced "The Church" (directed by Soavi).

      I shortly followed those up with viewing the visually brilliant 'The Sect' which had been retitled "The Devil's Daughtor" for home video (again directed by Soavi under Argento's supervision), and his "The Black Cat" segment of the Romero/Argento collaberative effort 'Two Evil Eyes'.
      Last edited by thomasjarvis; 05-11-2006, 03:31 PM.
      "A truly successful cinematic accomplishment inevitably results in the absolute compulsion of the viewer to discuss the film in question with one or more others for the duration of at least a good fifteen minutes, subsequent to initial screening."

      Comment


      • #33
        rare Argento movie T-shirts:

        http://www.rottencotton.com/index2.htm
        (Horror, Cult & Exploitation page 2)


        http://www.rottencotton.com/index2.htm
        (Horror, Cult & Exploitation page 2)


        http://www.lixonline.com/new_page_28.htm


        http://www.rottencotton.com/index2.htm
        (Rotton Cotton's Horror Exclusives)


        http://www.rottencotton.com/index2.htm
        (Horror, Cult & Exploitation page 1)


        http://www.rottencotton.com/index2.htm
        (Horror, Cult & Exploitation page 1)


        http://www.lixonline.com/new_page_28.htm


        http://www.lixonline.com/new_page_28.htm


        http://www.rottencotton.com/index2.htm
        (Horror, Cult & Exploitation page 2)
        "A truly successful cinematic accomplishment inevitably results in the absolute compulsion of the viewer to discuss the film in question with one or more others for the duration of at least a good fifteen minutes, subsequent to initial screening."

        Comment


        • #34
          Wow, I have so many Argento films on my list of movies to watch in the near future, it's ridiculous....I've really got to get my ass in gear and order a few of these movies...
          If you want to know the taste of a pear, you must change the pear by eating it yourself. If you want to know the theory and methods of revolution, you must take part in revolution. All genuine knowledge originates in direct experience.-
          Mao Zedong

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by BarkerRulez
            Wow, I have so many Argento films on my list of movies to watch in the near future, it's ridiculous....I've really got to get my ass in gear and order a few of these movies...
            Hell's yea...you need to get on that shit, bro. Which Argento films have you seen thusfar? That way, we would have a better idea as to what to recommend to you...
            "A truly successful cinematic accomplishment inevitably results in the absolute compulsion of the viewer to discuss the film in question with one or more others for the duration of at least a good fifteen minutes, subsequent to initial screening."

            Comment


            • #36
              Those are some awesome shirts.
              sigpic

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by Tool Shed
                Those are some awesome shirts.

                Hell yea they are, I need to get me some of these bad boys...
                Last edited by thomasjarvis; 04-10-2006, 05:14 PM.
                "A truly successful cinematic accomplishment inevitably results in the absolute compulsion of the viewer to discuss the film in question with one or more others for the duration of at least a good fifteen minutes, subsequent to initial screening."

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by thomasjarvis
                  Hell's yea...you need to get on that shit, bro. Which Argento films have you seen thusfar? That way, we would have a better idea as to what to recommend to you...
                  One you earlier informed me of, which I had forgotten he was involved ....Two Evil Eyes...I have it sitting in my DVD collection at home, collecting dust because I only watched it one night while inebriated...As you know, when watching a film while souped you don't remember much of it...So I'll have to re-watch that one...And I've seen Suspiria, and The Beyond...That's it....But I'd love to see more of his films
                  If you want to know the taste of a pear, you must change the pear by eating it yourself. If you want to know the theory and methods of revolution, you must take part in revolution. All genuine knowledge originates in direct experience.-
                  Mao Zedong

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by BarkerRulez
                    One you earlier informed me of, which I had forgotten he was involved ....Two Evil Eyes...I have it sitting in my DVD collection at home, collecting dust because I only watched it one night while inebriated...As you know, when watching a film while souped you don't remember much of it...So I'll have to re-watch that one...And I've seen Suspiria, and The Beyond...That's it....But I'd love to see more of his films
                    'The Beyond' is actually directed by Lucio Fulci, not Dario Argento.

                    First off, you should check out this introductory documentary film, directed by Argento's apprentice, Michele Soavi, who went on to helm 'The Cemetery Man' (aka 'Dellamorte Dellamore'):

                    'Dario Argento's World of Horror'
                    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/630...-8055356?n=130



                    This documentary is a positively enthralling introduction to his films.

                    Next, I would rewatch 'Suspiria', then follow it up with his official sequel:

                    'Inferno'
                    http://www.anchorbayentertainment.co...068&PriCatID=3
                    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/630...v=glance&n=130


                    After that, I would check out 'Phenomena', starring Jennifer Connelly from 'Labrynth', 'Dark City' and 'Dark Water':

                    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...v=glance&n=130


                    Then check out the other Dario Argento documentary, this one produced by the Independant Film Channel and featuring interviews with Dario's colleagues George Romero, John Carpenter, Alice Cooper as well as his daughtor Asia:

                    http://www.image-entertainment.com/d...roductID=10942


                    Follow those up with 'Tenebrae', then 'Deep Red' and 'Opera':

                    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...v=glance&n=130
                    http://www.anchorbayentertainment.co...069&PriCatID=3

                    http://www.anchorbayentertainment.co...853&PriCatID=3


                    Before checking out his other pre-'Suspiria' early 70's giallos, I'd next check out two of the most outright dream-like and positively surreal horror films Argento has ever been associated with, his collaberations with Michele Soavi:

                    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...v=glance&n=130


                    http://dvd.search.ebay.com/The-Sect_...2TheQ20SectQ22
                    Last edited by thomasjarvis; 05-27-2006, 02:25 AM.
                    "A truly successful cinematic accomplishment inevitably results in the absolute compulsion of the viewer to discuss the film in question with one or more others for the duration of at least a good fifteen minutes, subsequent to initial screening."

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Update on "Third Mother" film (from B-D mainpage):

                      http://www.bloody-disgusting.com/ind...plate=newsfull

                      "Today some big news popped up online regarding Dario Argento's highly anticipated "Mother of Tears" (aka "Third Mother"). The Horror Channel discovered, "Over at the official site for Profondo Rosso, the Italian store run by Luigi Cozzi that specializes in Italian horror collectibles, news was posted a few days back that Argento would be heading back to Italy to shoot 'Third Mother', which apparently has a pretty large budget thanks to Medusa and an American backer. Adam Gierasch and Jace Anderson (The Toolbox Murders) wrote the screenplay." 'Mother' is the final film in the 'Suspiria' and 'Inferno' trilogy."
                      ---blooody-disgusting.com
                      "A truly successful cinematic accomplishment inevitably results in the absolute compulsion of the viewer to discuss the film in question with one or more others for the duration of at least a good fifteen minutes, subsequent to initial screening."

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Wow.


                        I had no idea Soavi and Argento collaborated on two films......I really have to get my hands on the CHURCH.

                        I wonder what Wax would have been like had Fulci done the film. I haven't seen that either.

                        (NYC video rentals are declining in quality I must say ; if you can believe it)

                        I loved the order given as a recommendation for getting into Argento.


                        When I was a young teen I became fascinated with the names of his films as well, which is what prompted me to rent The Bird with THe Crystal Plumage.

                        All those very early Argento films transferred to VHS were totally messed up but I still loved them, and once I saw Suspiria I flipped out. It is such a beautifully shot film and I love the story. Inferno was good, but Opera is one I would like to actually own-Scratch that I want them all




                        I have alot of Goblin Soundtracks including the Suspiria one, fun to listen to when in a strange mood

                        Oh:and from filmfanzine:

                        In his films he uses closeups of eyes, frequently that of the killer. All narration in his films is his own voice. In his movies, whenever a male murderer's hands only are shown (especially in scenes killing women) Dario Argento uses his own hands.
                        I forgot about the eye close-ups....
                        Last edited by licata1708; 05-11-2006, 08:22 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          I believe I've read that book...Was there a novel of "The Church"?? That cover looks mighty familiar, and I believe I've read a novel with that exact same cover....
                          If you want to know the taste of a pear, you must change the pear by eating it yourself. If you want to know the theory and methods of revolution, you must take part in revolution. All genuine knowledge originates in direct experience.-
                          Mao Zedong

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by licata1708
                            Wow.
                            I had no idea Soavi and Argento collaborated on two films......I really have to get my hands on the CHURCH.
                            Argento's collaberations with Soavi aproximate the true climax to his non-giallo, supernatural "phantasmagoria" cycle, that was first barely hinted at with the briefly depicted psychic charactor in 'Deep Red' before puttting full-on pedal-to-the-metal with 'Suspiria' and 'Inferno', as well as 'Phenomena' to a partial degree. Despite Soavi's official directorial designation on 'The Church' and 'The Sect', these two films represent the fullest realization of Argento's surreal and nightmarish cinematic style. Soavi later alluded to the reality of the two films belonging as much or more to Argento's body of work than to his own.

                            This is not to say that either film is without it's substantial flaws. Kiddcapone's rather scathing assessment of 'The Church' is a valid and fairly spot-on criticism. However the film itself is still worth a look. It is a flawed epic, but certain surreal moments alone make the film worth the price of rental (or, in my case, DVD purchase).

                            'The Church' also pays some thematic tribute to Argento's 'Inferno', his original sequel to 'Suspiria', in that the cathedral features hidden gears and mechanisms within it's walls that control the opening and closing of doors, rooms and hidden passageways. in 'Inferno', the building was secretly dominated by the Second Mother and her minions, while in 'The Church' the building was built like a giant mechanical booby-trap; no one is operating the gears from behind the scenes, but rather the internal mechanisms were set to automatically spring into action following the appropriate series of events. A complexly disguised death machine set to go off by the persecuted alchemists who designed it in medieval times.

                            This idea of a "living" mechanical builiding was later lifted directly from 'Inferno' and 'The Church' by Jace Anderson and Adam Gierasch for their 'Tool Box Murders' sceenplay. Funny how Dario has now hired them to script his sequel to 'Suspiria' and 'Inferno'. Obvioulsy, he caught the references to his own work and deduced that they would be ideally suited for his long anticipated 'Three Mothers' climax.

                            By far, 'The Sect' is far superior to the 'The Church'. It has better flow, moves lalong at a faster pace, is less awkward overall, and features some of the most intensely vivid and abstract sequences of Argento's entire career. If I had to choose between one or the other, I'd choose 'The Sect', without hesitation.

                            Originally posted by licata1708
                            I wonder what Wax would have been like had Fulci done the film. I haven't seen that either. .
                            I wonder that as well. I have a feeling it would that have been a more satisfying movie if Fulci had lived long enough to complete work on the project. Lucio's daughtor, Antonia, reportedly disowned the film. To be perfectly honest, I haven't seen it yet either, although I've always wanted to (so don't feel bad).

                            Originally posted by licata1708
                            I loved the order given as a recommendation for getting into Argento.
                            Uhh, thanks. Did I come off as a tad but overbearing, perhaps?

                            Originally posted by licata1708
                            When I was a young teen I became fascinated with the names of his films as well, which is what prompted me to rent The Bird with THe Crystal Plumage.
                            Mine was 'Dario Argento's World of Horror' back when I was 12 years old, shortly folllowed by 'Suspiria', then 'Phenomena' which I found on VHS in severely truncated form as "Creepers", within a year and a half after that I manged to locate 'Inferno' and 'Tenbrae' in it's censored form as "Unsane". I was certainly fascinated by his early giallo titles, this being the chief impetus behind my initial curiosity regarding his work.

                            After seeing 'Dario Argento's World of Horror', it was the surreal imagery and dream like lke logic pervading his works that drew me in. I'm embarrased to admit that I still haven't seen 'Bird With the Crystal Plummage', 'Cat O' Nine Tails' or 'Four Flies On Grey Velvet'...but damn I sure do want to. "Four Flies On Grey Velvet"...I think that's like one of the greatest titles for a horror movie of all freakin' time!

                            Originally posted by licata1708
                            All those very early Argento films transferred to VHS were totally messed up but I still loved them, and once I saw Suspiria I flipped out. It is such a beautifully shot film and I love the story. Inferno was good, but Opera is one I would like to actually own-Scratch that I want them all
                            My goal is certainly to own them all...Argento's work is alot like that of David Lynch and David Cronenberg, in the sence that one has to take in the majority of these artists' works as a whole before the individual films can truly be appreciated within their own unique contexts.

                            Originally posted by licata1708
                            I have alot of Goblin Soundtracks including the Suspiria one, fun to listen to when in a strange mood
                            Wow...wish I could say the same, I'd love to get ahold of those. Haven't gotten around to it yet, for me completing the Argento film library comes first. Once I've accomplished that then I'll get around to picking up some of Goblin's many compositions on CD.
                            Last edited by thomasjarvis; 05-13-2006, 02:19 PM.
                            "A truly successful cinematic accomplishment inevitably results in the absolute compulsion of the viewer to discuss the film in question with one or more others for the duration of at least a good fifteen minutes, subsequent to initial screening."

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by BarkerRulez
                              I believe I've read that book...Was there a novel of "The Church"?? That cover looks mighty familiar, and I believe I've read a novel with that exact same cover....
                              I don't think Soavi and Argento's 'The Church' has any dircect connection to a book of the same name. Perhaps you've just seen the DVD cover before, or else perhaps the cover of the novel was somewhat similar?

                              Regardless, I would highly reccommend you check out the film...but only as a double feature with 'The Sect'. The two films somewhat tie together, seeing as how they encapsulate only times that Argento and Soavi collaberated with eachother in this unique capascity... they would make a great double bill.

                              However 'The Sect' is a far more satisfying film, speaking for myself at least. You can find 'The Sect' as an old VHS release under the title "The Devil's Daughtor", or if you have a region free DVD player like the Philips 642 or can watch it on your PC and convert it to region 1 by buring it to another disc, the you pick up the uncut widescreen import disc "La Setta" from Xploited Cinema:
                              http://www.xploitedcinema.com/dvds/dvds.asp?title=781

                              There's also this eBay seller who offers a region 1/region 0 DVD of the uncut widscreen version:
                              http://search.ebay.com/_W0QQsassZharbinger1976QQhtZ-1
                              "A truly successful cinematic accomplishment inevitably results in the absolute compulsion of the viewer to discuss the film in question with one or more others for the duration of at least a good fifteen minutes, subsequent to initial screening."

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                I just found a really great site on "The Curch" which does a bit of analyzing.

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