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  • #31
    Originally posted by AleisterArcane
    Appreciate? The only Cannibal movie worth appreciating is Cannibal Holocaust. The movie isnt great, but i do admire its balls to the wall approach to the subject matter. I also like the fact the movie seemed real and that made the movie experience that much more disturbing. The special effects were top notch and the atmosphere was just right. I love a horror film that isnt afraid to go there.

    The rest of those Cannibal movies are cheap immitations and deserve to be forgotten not appreciated. They were too cheesy and tried too hard to follow in Cannibal Holocaust foot steps...and failed.
    but what about the cannibal films that were made before Cannibal Holocaust? i think that Man From Deep River was a good cannibal film and it came years before Cannibal Holocaust. and what about Eaten Alive (Mangiati Vivi)? released the same year as Cannibal Holocaust and is also a good film.



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    • #32
      Originally posted by Ballscratch
      but what about the cannibal films that were made before Cannibal Holocaust? i think that Man From Deep River was a good cannibal film and it came years before Cannibal Holocaust. and what about Eaten Alive (Mangiati Vivi)? released the same year as Cannibal Holocaust and is also a good film.
      Ive never seen Man from Deep River and Eaten Alive. After being disappointed with cannibal movies like Massacre In Dinosaur Valley, Cannibal Ferox, and Cannibal Apocalypse, i had given up on this sub genre. Those movie were just so terrible, i didnt care to track down any more of them. Cannibal Holocaust is the only one that had really left an impact on me. The movie stays with you after watching, i didnt get that with the others. They just seemd like cheap rip offs and tried to top Holocaust.

      Now as for the dates, im pretty sure the ones i have seen came out in the early and mid 80's.

      Is Man from Deep River worth a watch?

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      • #33
        i believe it is. i enjoyed it lots. it has been a while since i've seen it though. annd it was made in '72, while most others, i believe, were mostly made in the early 80's. Eaten Alive was also a fun watch. i didn't mind Cannibal Ferox, but it did have an aire of Cannibal Holocaust to it.



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        • #34
          Originally posted by AleisterArcane
          Ive never seen Man from Deep River and Eaten Alive. After being disappointed with cannibal movies like Massacre In Dinosaur Valley, Cannibal Ferox, and Cannibal Apocalypse, i had given up on this sub genre. Those movie were just so terrible, i didnt care to track down any more of them. Cannibal Holocaust is the only one that had really left an impact on me. The movie stays with you after watching, i didnt get that with the others. They just seemd like cheap rip offs and tried to top Holocaust.

          Now as for the dates, im pretty sure the ones i have seen came out in the early and mid 80's.

          Is Man from Deep River worth a watch?
          You might want to check out 'Jungle Holocaust' aka 'Last Cannibal World', that one came out before 'Cannibal Holocaust' and was executed by the same director. Ruggero Deodato used 'Jungle Holocaust' to test the waters a bit, a sort of warm-up to 'Cannibal Holocaust'. I also think Deodato's 'Cut and Run' is worth a look, it may not be as brutal and realistic as 'Cannibal Holocaust', but it's an entertaining and occasionally disturbing action/adventure-drama, with Michael Berryman in a small role. Not exactly a straight-up "cannibal movie" per se, but interesting none the less.

          I have yet to see Lenzi's 'Man From Deep River', but since it kick-started the entire subgenre, I am looking forward to viewing it, if for no other reason than to gain some historical perspective on this odd and short-lived little corner of the Italian exploitation film industry.
          Last edited by thomasjarvis; 04-09-2006, 10:00 PM.
          "A truly successful cinematic accomplishment inevitably results in the absolute compulsion of the viewer to discuss the film in question with one or more others for the duration of at least a good fifteen minutes, subsequent to initial screening."

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          • #35
            Ah, what the hell, ill give Man from Deep River a look. If i enjoy it, ill give Eaten Alive a chance.

            Off to ebay i go......

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            • #36
              Originally posted by AleisterArcane
              Ah, what the hell, ill give Man from Deep River a look. If i enjoy it, ill give Eaten Alive a chance.

              Off to ebay i go......
              What about Deodato's 'Jungle Holocaust'? He made that one a couple of years before he directed 'Cannibal Holocaust'. You are probably more likely to enjoy 'Jungle Holocaust' (aka 'Last Cannibal World') than 'Man From Deep River'.

              Why? Because you hated 'Cannibal Ferox', which was directed by Umberto Lenzi who also directed 'Man From Deep River'. However, you seemed to be moved by 'Cannibal Holocaust', which was directed by Ruggero Deodato, who also directed 'Jungle Holocaust'.

              It seems Deodato's directorial style, as represented in 'Jungle Holocaust' and 'Cannibal Holocaust', might be more suited to your sensibilties than that of Umberto Lenzi, who helmed 'Cannibal Ferox', a film to which you did not react favorably.

              Originally posted by mrbishop77
              If you don't like this one ['Man From Deep River'] DON'T watch Eaten Alive for it is basically the same movie. Not plot wise but because they use EXACTLY the same footage in each of them.

              I still have to say that Mountain of the Cannibal God is my favorite, with Cannibal Holocaust coming in a close second.
              There you go, AleisterArcane. You've been forewarned concerning the similarities between 'Eaten Alive' and 'Man From Deep River'. You'd probably be better off sticking with Deodato's "jungle trilogy" ('Jungle Holocaust', 'Cannibal Holocaust' and 'Cut and Run'). But you don't have to take my word for it (and I don't imagine that you will).
              Last edited by thomasjarvis; 04-10-2006, 12:11 PM.
              "A truly successful cinematic accomplishment inevitably results in the absolute compulsion of the viewer to discuss the film in question with one or more others for the duration of at least a good fifteen minutes, subsequent to initial screening."

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by AleisterArcane
                Ive never seen Man from Deep River and Eaten Alive. After being disappointed with cannibal movies like Massacre In Dinosaur Valley, Cannibal Ferox, and Cannibal Apocalypse, i had given up on this sub genre. Those movie were just so terrible, i didnt care to track down any more of them. Cannibal Holocaust is the only one that had really left an impact on me. The movie stays with you after watching, i didnt get that with the others. They just seemd like cheap rip offs and tried to top Holocaust.

                Now as for the dates, im pretty sure the ones i have seen came out in the early and mid 80's.

                Is Man from Deep River worth a watch?
                I think we all know that as a sub genre this type of film requires a six pack before even begining to think that these flicks are "good". I agree though.....Cannibal Holocaust is the cream de la crop.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by ZOMBIE COMMANDO
                  I think we all know that as a sub genre this type of film requires a six pack before even begining to think that these flicks are "good". I agree though.....Cannibal Holocaust is the cream de la crop.
                  Yea, I would agree with you guys in that 'Cannibal Holocaust' is the masterpiece out of all of them. I enjoy a few of the others as well, there's just something unexplainably creepy about many of them...it's not just the subject matter. It's the cheesy music, the grainy camera work, the jungle setting...all these elements combine to give us something refreshingly different from the mainstream. It's such a peculiar subgenre. A very strange and unique era for Italian exploitation. There's been nothing quite like it, before or since. Perhaps that's something we can all be thankfull for!

                  But yea, you are correct ZC, these definitely go down better with some sort of mind altering substance, be that what it may.
                  "A truly successful cinematic accomplishment inevitably results in the absolute compulsion of the viewer to discuss the film in question with one or more others for the duration of at least a good fifteen minutes, subsequent to initial screening."

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    My ideas for a Depodato directed, jungle-based sequel to 'Cannibal Holocuast', instead of his announced 'Cannibal Metropolitana':

                    I think Deodato should have went with the jungle location. Or perhaps make it a trilogy, filming the two sequels back-to-back, one urban and one island. The Professor Munroe charactor should return in both films, as a link to the original. He wouldn't have to be played by Robert Kerman. 25 years have passed, I think an actor could be found who better resembles the aged charactor than Kerman himself. Here's my idea for the jungle scenario:

                    Someone releated to one of the charactors who perished in the first film, possibly the younger brother of Fay Daniels, has become obsessed with the events that took his sister's life. He has been told all his life by his family that the Yates crew died in some sort of accident, because Fay's father deemed the truth to be far too disturbing for his children to bare, especially since his daughtor is implicated in the mistreatment and murder of certain natives by the surviving footage, which would be an embarrasment to the family name. So the truth is suppressed and the footage kept under lock and key by the Professor, upon the request of Fay's father.

                    Somehow, Fay's brother discovers certain facts relating to his sister's death, and begins a quest to view the footage for himself. Upon finally seeing it, he is driven mad with grief and despair, and takes it upon himself to travel to the island and hunt down the natives who murdered his sister. He takes with him several friends whom he isn't completely honest with about his intentions or what awaites them upon reaching their destination.

                    He does this under the pretense of research for a book or possibly a new documentary, maybe even fooling some of them into thinking it would be "just like that 'Survivor' show". Film cameras are brought along for the purpose of documenting the experience. He also recruits some bounty hunter and survivalist types along the way.

                    But none of the team, including even the survivalists, are prepared for the horrors that await them within the heart of the jungle, or the depths of depravity to which Fay's brother will stoop to fullfill his all consuming passion for avenging his sister's death, as he slips deeper and deeper into dementia...not to mention the ferocity with which the natives will fight back, and the punishment they dish out to all interlopers who dare tresspass upon their territory
                    Last edited by thomasjarvis; 02-02-2007, 05:33 PM.
                    "A truly successful cinematic accomplishment inevitably results in the absolute compulsion of the viewer to discuss the film in question with one or more others for the duration of at least a good fifteen minutes, subsequent to initial screening."

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by thomasjarvis
                      My ideas for a Depodato directed, jungle-based sequel to 'Cannibal Holocuast', instead of his announced 'Cannibal Metropolitana':

                      I think Deodato should have went with the jungle location. Or perhaps make it a trilogy, filming the two sequels back-to-back, one urban and one island. The Professor Munroe charactor should return in both films, as a link to the original. He wouldn't have to be played by Robert Kerman. 25 years have passed, I think an actor could be found who better resembles the aged charactor than Kerman himself. Here's my idea for the jungle scenario:

                      Someone releated to one of the charactors who perished in the first film, possibly the younger brother of Fay Daniels, has become obseesed with the events that took his sister's life. He has been told all his life by his family that the Yates crew died in some sort of accident, because Fay's father deemed the truth to be far too disturbing for his children to bare, especially since his daughtor is implicated in the mistreatment and murder of certain natives by the surviving footage, which would be an embarrasment to the family name. So the truth is suppressed and the footage kept under lock and key by the Professor, upon the request of Fay's father.

                      Somehow, Fay's brother discovers certain facts relating to his sister's death, and begins a quest to view the footage for himself. Upon finally seeing it, he is driven mad with grief and despair, and takes it upon himself to travel to the island and hunt down the natives who murdered his sister. He takes with him several friends whom he isn't completely honest with about his intentions or what awaites them upon reaching their destination.

                      He does this under the pretense of research for a book or possibly a new documentary, maybe even fooling some of them into thinking it would be "just like that 'Survivor' show". Film cameras are brought along for the purpose of documenting the experience. He also recruits some bounty hunter and survivalist types along the way.

                      But none of the team, including even the survivalists, are prepared for the horrors that await them within the heart of the jungle, or the depths of depravity to which Fay's brother will stoop to fullfill his all consuming passion for avenging his sister's death, as he slips deeper and deeper into dementia...not to mention the ferocity with which the natives will fight back, and the punishment they dish out to all interlopers who dare tresspass upon their territory

                      Wow. That sounds fantastic...........really truly fantastic.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by licata1708
                        Wow. That sounds fantastic...........really truly fantastic.
                        Thank you! Figured I'd give it a shot...

                        Oh yea, I should add: the footage was ordered to be destroyed at the end of 'Cannibal Holocaust', so obviously some enterprising young lab assistant took it upon himself to make a duplicate print, and this is what Fay's brother tracks down.
                        "A truly successful cinematic accomplishment inevitably results in the absolute compulsion of the viewer to discuss the film in question with one or more others for the duration of at least a good fifteen minutes, subsequent to initial screening."

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by thomasjarvis
                          Thank you! Figured I'd give it a shot...

                          Oh yea, I should add: the footage was ordered to be destroyed at the end of 'Cannibal Holocaust', so obviously some enterprising young lab assistant took it upon himself to make a duplicate print, and this is what Fay's brother tracks down.
                          Perfect!

                          PS anyone know what is up with the new Soavi film and is it or isnt it a zombie film as I read somewhere recently:

                          Fans of Michele Soavi should take note that he is going to direct GOODBYE LOVE HELLO or ARRIVEDERCI AMORE, CIAO based on the story by Massimo Carlotto. The story of a criminal career. The story of a man with no morals, no scruples. Thief, killer, traitor. He betrays his friends, his women. No afterthoughts. Until he meets her...
                          Last edited by licata1708; 05-16-2006, 03:08 PM.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by licata1708
                            anyone know what is up with the new Soavi film and is it or isnt it a zombie film as I read somewhere recently:
                            Definitely NOT a "zombie film":
                            http://imdb.com/title/tt0325011/#comment

                            Originally posted by enricochionni
                            It is an awful movie. It is incredible since the Novel by Massimo Carlotto was so good. Probably Carlotto should have be involved in the screenplay writing to realize a better movie. The only positive point is Michele Placido , great interpretation. I do not understand how a director such as Soavi could make a terrible movie from a very good story. The music is good and the song is beautiful. I am really upset since I love the "noir" and we could have a good chance....... Sorry but I really did not like It, the screenplay has so many problems and some scenes makes you laugh since they are almost ridicule. All the actors except Placido are not as good as we know them. Enrico
                            Originally posted by fulvio-1
                            No way, Arrivederci Amore Ciao is the best Italian Thriller released in the last 30 years! It's perfect, taken from a very good novel written by Massimo Carlotto, directed by Michele Soavi, who made horror movies like Dellamorte Dellamore(Cemetery Man)and La Chiesa(The Church), this movie takes your attention up from the beginning till the end. There's no hope of redemption in the screenplay, there's no hope of being a better man. The main character, played by Alessio Boni, who is as awful as always in the acting, but absolutely perfect for the role, is a former terrorist that wants to have a respectable middle class life after years of escape in South America. But if he really wants it, he's got to be ready to do everything, to betray the former comrades, to kill everyone! Michele Placido, director of the still good Romanzo Criminale(Crime Novel), in the role of the corrupted cop is incredible, perfect! I repeat: a fantastic movie, terrifying!At the end of it, I saw people desperately crying in the cinema...If you're going to see it, you'll understand why. Welcome Back to the cinema, Michele Soavi!!! This is the real good New Italian Cinema! These(Arrivederci, Romanzo Criminale, Occhi di Cristallo) are the movies Italy has got to show the world! Go and see it now, if you can.
                            "A truly successful cinematic accomplishment inevitably results in the absolute compulsion of the viewer to discuss the film in question with one or more others for the duration of at least a good fifteen minutes, subsequent to initial screening."

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              excerpts taken from 'The Deep Red Horror Handbook' edited by Chas. Balun, published by FantaCo 1989, essay "The Third World Cannibal Films" by Steve Bissette:

                              "Of the entire genre, only three of the "mondo" spawn are relevant to this discussion of the pre-history and eventual rise of the Italian Third World Cannibal cycle:

                              1) The Acadamy Award winning 'THE SKY ABOVE, THE MUD BELOW'/'BLACK AND WHITE IN COLOR' (1961) was a legitimate documentary that found its audience in the wake of 'MONDO CANE' (1961). Though showman Joseph E. Levine sucessfully exploited it as a "shockumentary", director Pierr-Dominque Gaisseau crafted an ambitious and enthralling documentary-adventure. Filmed in 1959 and 1960, the film chroniclesa a French/Belgian/Dutch expedition into the previously unexplored regions of New Guinea.

                              Its anthropology may be superficial, but it is valid, and it refuses to dwell upon the grotesque and perverse apects inherant to it's subject matter. Though these people are headhunters and cannibals, respect for their humanity and customs is maintained throughout, in stark contrast to the "mondo" films. It is the latter part of the exploration where the adventure turns into a true test of endurance, that the film becomes grueling. Illness, insects and leeches take their toll before the film reaches its conclusion. It is this milieu and the introductory aerial views of the New Guinea jungles that later became cinematic staple ingrediants of the fictional Itallian Third World Cannibal cycle.



                              --------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              2) Jacopetti and Prosperi's 'AFRICA ADDIO'/'AFRICA:BLOOD AND GUTS' was, in its original 126-minute version, a political powerkeg. Charles Kilgore properly refers to it as "the Moby Dick of the mondo genre" (Ecoo No. 1, Jan/Feb., 1988, pg. 5), though it is difficult to assess today.

                              Too volatile and brutal for mainstream distribution, 'AFRICA ADDIO' opened to face international scandal and legal charges leveled against the filmmakers, controversy that proved too dificult to exploit given the gravity of the charges and the film's difficult subject matter (as well as its length). It played briefly in America, only to disappear and eventually become acquired by Cinemation producer Jerry Gross, who trimmed almost an hour of footage (retaining only the most grusome sequences, now shorn of their context) and rereleased it in 1972 on the exploitation circuit as 'AFRICA BLOOD AND GUTS'. Unfortunately, this truncated version was the only available for over three decades [that is, untill the good folks at Blue Underground recently released both versions on a special edition DVD--TJ].

                              Jacopetti, Prosperi and their crew reportedly spent three years in Africa; their original plan being to produce another "shockumentary" to follow up the sucess of their previous sensation 'MONDO CANE', but when revolution and civil war broke out in 1963 and 1964, their cynical "shockumentary" became deadly serious. Being the only Western journalists and cinematographers to film much of the violence that was ripping across the Dark Continent and successfully bring that film out of the country, 'AFRICA ADDIO' became a legitimate, if viscious, document of events most of the Western world was unaware of.

                              Indeed, 'AFRICA ADDIO' proved too potent and horrorifically graphic for most audiences, but the controversy began before the film was even released. Journalist Carlo Gregoretti claimed to have witnessed Jacopetti and crew participate in the execution of three young boys during an attack on Boende and his accusations were printed as a lengthy artical in the December 20th 1964 issue of L'Espresso. Jacopetti publically denied the acusation and offered the fact (later substantiated by African authorities) that they had saved the lives of at least four people at great risk to their own safety. Special interest groups and African embassies tried to prevent the film's release, while bomb threats and riots accompanied its premieres inside and outside of Italy.

                              Harrowing as 'AFRICA ADDIO' (and its crudely abridged version 'AFRICA BLOOD AND GUTS') may well be, the accusations and controversy that surrounded its making and final release remain it legacy. The notoriety attached to Jacopetti, Prosperi and their film overshadows what may be their finest and most daring accomplishments as filmmakers.

                              http://www.blue-underground.com/movie.php?movie_id=38


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                              3) Paolo Cavara's 'THE WILD EYE' clearly based its story upon the 'AFRICA ADDIO' controversy, and the suspicion focused on the sensationalistic school of journalism it (and the "mondo" genre) charactorized.
                              --------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              In summation, as regards Deodato's 'CANNIBAL HOLOCAUST', these three films from the 1960's provide all its essential elements.

                              'THE SKY ABOVE, THE MUD BELOW', vividly presents the setting and mileu. 'AFRICA ADDIO''s relentless vocabulary and the attendant controversy over Jacopetti and his crew's possible participation in (and manipulation of) the all-to-real carnage (of both the animal and human variety), provides the catalytic subtext and the documentary format (falsified by Deodato) for 'CANNIBAL HOLOCAUST'.

                              Cavara's 'THE WILD EYE' is Deodato's fictional prototype, not only in its preoccupation with damning Jacopetti and company through the vehicle of its central charactor, but also in doing so with such extreme vehemence and violence that one inevitably questions the intent and integrity of the film's supposed "message". In a review of 'THE WILD EYE', film critic Richard F. Shepard remarked the following:

                              "In preaching the iniquities of pandering to the starved savagery of the viewing public, the film practices what it preaches [against]."

                              Ditto with 'CANNIBAL HOLOCAUST'."

                              --Steve Bissette, "The Deep Red Horror Handbook"
                              Last edited by thomasjarvis; 05-23-2006, 02:14 AM.
                              "A truly successful cinematic accomplishment inevitably results in the absolute compulsion of the viewer to discuss the film in question with one or more others for the duration of at least a good fifteen minutes, subsequent to initial screening."

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                excerpts taken from 'The Deep Red Horror Handbook' edited by Chas. Balun, published by FantaCo 1989, essay "The Third World Cannibal Films" by Steve Bissette:

                                "The first of the Italian Cannibal films was 'MAN FROM DEEP RIVER' aka 'DEEP RIVER SAVAGES' (1972), and it actually features only a brief sequence of cannibalism. It did, however, define the ambience the Third World Cycle would come to embrace, as well as introduce the actor (Ivan Rassimov), actress (Me Me Lai, "Lay" in some sources) and director (Umberto Lenzi) most associated with the genre.

                                'Man From Deep River' is a competent, though hardly rousing, adventure film. With the story and performances (especially former TV personality Me Me Lai, whose exotic beauty compensates for her insepid acting) barely serviceable, director Lenzi relies uppon Riccardo Pallottini's cinematography and frequent doses of sex and graphic violence to liven up the proceedings. The graphic sex and violence is, of course, Lenzi's raison d'etre, acceptably integral to the story, and lent it an exploitable hard-core cutting edge over its comparitively big budgeted Hollywood model, 'A MAN CALLED HORSE'.

                                As in 'A MAN CALLED HORSE' (and as the prologue titles promises), tribal life and and brutal rituals are rigerously recreated, though Lenzi stages sequences that are far grislier than any Sioux Indian ritual commited to film. We see a cobra and a mongoose duel, a cockfight, a crocodile eviscerated alive, fertility rites in which a snake is slit and bled onto Marya's belly and crotch, a goat's throat is cut as Marya's baby is born, a widow is ritualistically fucked in the ashes of her husband's funeral pyre, etc. Here also is the first appearance of the notorious monkey brain-eating sequence: a squirming monkey's head is locked into a brace, the top of his skull macheted off, his warm brains scooped out and eaten. Precursor to similar scenes in 'FACES OF DEATH' and Lenzi's own 'CANNIBAL FEROX' aka 'MAKE THEM DIE SLOWLY' (inwhich Lenzi outdoes himself by replacing the monkey with actor John Morghen). Here it is used to brutally puncuate the film's leisurely pacing, framed by equally severe (though simulated, unlike the monkey's fate) tribal punishments (tongues cut out, hands lopped off, etc.). The blunt, straightforward ferocity of this gory procession minimizes the impact of the film's central setpiece, as Bradley is bound and spun around in a bamboo pillory with venomed darts blown into his flesh, then tied down in the sun...a pale revision of the sun ceremony in 'A MAN CALLED HORSE'.

                                More memorable was a brief but vivid sequence of cannibalism. A native beauty and her boyfriend are chased by a group of hideous savages; filthy, partially toothless prototypes for all the Italian Cannibals yet to come. Trying to save her, the boyfriend is mortally wounded and crawls to Bradley and Marya while the cannibals strip, gang rape and kill the girl. Bradley stealthily approaches to find the cannibals seated around her body, chowing down on her dismembered limbs as another casually slices off her breast and eats it (this precedes a similar image in Jorge Grau's 'BREAKFAST AT MANCHESTER MORGUE').

                                Staged with Lenzi's characteristically deadpan, naturalistic manner, the scene proved effective despite the faked gore; enhanced with evocative, on-location color cinematography, the scene contrasts the black-and-white "Cannibal noir" of Romero's 'NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD'). Knowingly or not, Lenzi had presented something previously unseen on the screen in this brief, three minute sequence.This sequence would outlast the context of 'MAN FROM DEEP RIVER', appearing again as stock footage in Lenzi's 'THE EMERALD JUNGLE' aka 'EATEN ALIVE' (1980), and indeed prove to be the catalyst for the entire Third World Cannibal cycle."

                                --Steve Bissette, 'The Deep Red Horror Handbook'
                                Last edited by thomasjarvis; 05-23-2006, 03:13 AM.
                                "A truly successful cinematic accomplishment inevitably results in the absolute compulsion of the viewer to discuss the film in question with one or more others for the duration of at least a good fifteen minutes, subsequent to initial screening."

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