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  • Originally posted by Jack the Pin View Post
    The Devil All the Time by Donald Ray Pollock

    Pollock began writing late in life. He lives in the Ohio back country where poverty, ignorance, and violence are the standard by which people live. His writing is concise, his subject matter macabre, and he has an eerie gift for capturing the strange world of outcasts, deranged and charismatic religious fanatics, and serial murderers. This novel, his first, is about as far away from the current American literary standard of smarmy postmodernism as you can get. He writes with grit, with heart, and with blood. And he doesn't flinch.
    Originally posted by Caustic Coffee View Post
    I just finished this about a month ago. This one of the finest books I've ever read, ever. The textured way he describes such a stark, often vicious culture perfectly contrasted the ugliness of the story. Beyond great writing, it was a great plot and a satisfying conclusion. I couldn't wait to read to the end and then I just wanted to read it again.
    Looks like I've found my next book. This sounds like something I'd enjoy.

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    • Originally posted by Caustic Coffee View Post
      I just finished this about a month ago. This one of the finest books I've ever read, ever. The textured way he describes such a stark, often vicious culture perfectly contrasted the ugliness of the story. Beyond great writing, it was a great plot and a satisfying conclusion. I couldn't wait to read to the end and then I just wanted to read it again.
      Have you ever considered a career in writing book reviews?

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      • Originally posted by Rusted View Post
        Looks like I've found my next book. This sounds like something I'd enjoy.
        I'm eager to hear what you think.


        Originally posted by voodoo_dolly View Post
        Have you ever considered a career in writing book reviews?
        Ha, thank you.

        I actually do write book reviews for Punk Place, Poets and Writers and School Library Journal, just not that often. I'm hoping to be a regular reviewer for Publishers Weekly next fall, fingers crossed.

        When a book is amazing, the adjectives and comparisons just flow out of you; when it sucks, you have to fight to think of something good to say, because you kind of sound like a dick when you just hammer a book through the whole review. The bad reviews seem like they'd be amusing to go wild on, the way some of us enjoy tearing Rob Zombie apart, but the publications won't accept them if they aren't measured criticisms.
        Last edited by Caustic Coffee; 03-09-2013, 11:41 AM.

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        • Originally posted by Caustic Coffee View Post

          When a book is amazing, the adjectives and comparisons just flow out of you; when it sucks, you have to fight to think of something good to say, because you kind of sound like a dick when you just hammer a book through the whole review. The bad reviews seem like they'd be amusing to go wild on, the way some of us enjoy tearing Rob Zombie apart, but the publications won't accept them if they aren't measured criticisms.
          This is so as you say, when you enjoy something, like a book in this case, words, feelings and thoughts are unleashed naturally, like an explosion of sensations difficult to contain. An internal obligation forces you to express what you felt.

          When something does not work for you, you have to make an enormous effort to avoid defects and find something worthwhile good to say. When you have to think too much about something, is a sign that is not working, at least not insofar as you thought.

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          • Gracefully Insane: The Rise and Fall of America's Premiere Mental Asylum

            The history of McLean, home to such famous individuals as Sylvia Plath, Ray Charles, James Taylor, Susanna Kaysen (author of Girl, Interrupted), and Anne Sexton.

            McLean also played as the muse for The Bell Jar and Girl, Interrupted.

            It was an okay read but I think I'd rather read about a low class mental hospital full of dangerous experimental psychiatry and sub standard living conditions versus an upscale asylum for the rich.

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            • Michael Crichton - Eaters Of The Dead

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              • Originally posted by Jack the Pin View Post
                The Devil All the Time by Donald Ray Pollock

                Pollock began writing late in life. He lives in the Ohio back country where poverty, ignorance, and violence are the standard by which people live. His writing is concise, his subject matter macabre, and he has an eerie gift for capturing the strange world of outcasts, deranged and charismatic religious fanatics, and serial murderers. This novel, his first, is about as far away from the current American literary standard of smarmy postmodernism as you can get. He writes with grit, with heart, and with blood. And he doesn't flinch.
                Originally posted by Caustic Coffee View Post


                I just finished this about a month ago. This one of the finest books I've ever read, ever. The textured way he describes such a stark, often vicious culture perfectly contrasted the ugliness of the story. Beyond great writing, it was a great plot and a satisfying conclusion. I couldn't wait to read to the end and then I just wanted to read it again.
                Picked up this and Knockemstiff (short story collection) because of you guys. Both were excellent. I'd recommend The Devil All The Time to pretty much everyone.

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                • Comment


                  • I don't think this guy actually watched some of the films he's 'reviewed' in this book. Also the cover is very misleading since he doesn't just cover slasher films, there are films such as Demons, Evil Dead, Dawn of the Dead and Dracula in there.


                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Mr. Bill View Post
                      I don't think this guy actually watched some of the films he's 'reviewed' in this book. Also the cover is very misleading since he doesn't just cover slasher films, there are films such as Demons, Evil Dead, Dawn of the Dead and Dracula in there.

                      Glad I passed on that then.

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                      • After finishing book 4 about two months ago, I took a short break. The books in Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series are extremely long, complex, epic, and entertaining... quite heavy reading. Today I decided I had taken a long enough break and started reading book 5. With this book included, I have 10 left to go....



                        Fantasy fans MUST READ THIS SERIES
                        Last edited by The Revelator; 05-01-2013, 02:46 PM.

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                        • Comment


                          • Originally posted by Mr. Bill View Post
                            I don't think this guy actually watched some of the films he's 'reviewed' in this book. Also the cover is very misleading since he doesn't just cover slasher films, there are films such as Demons, Evil Dead, Dawn of the Dead and Dracula in there.

                            That's how I felt about John Landis's Book of Monsters since he catorized several things wrong.

                            My Pet Zombie Hates Your Guts But Loves Your Brain!!

                            Special Thanks to H.P. Pufncraft for making you want to click on my brain!!


                            My Horror Musings with a Psychotic Twist
                            Welcome to the Asylum: You Know You're Certifiable

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                            • "The Lost World" - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - 6/10
                              "Meg: Origins" - Steve Alten - 8/10
                              "Blockade Billy" - Stephen King - 9/10
                              "The Ghost Pirates" - William Hope Hodgson - Written in 1909, it has great atmosphere and spookiness. - 8/10
                              "Pines" - Blake Crouch - Started off as a Twin Peaksean mystery/thriller but degraded into willingness of disbelief-stretching sci-fi conclusion. - 7/10
                              "And Then There Were None" - Agatha Christie - 9/10
                              "House of Fear" - edited by Jonathan Oliver - Haunted house stories mostly by British authors including Sarah Pinborough, Christopher Priest, Tim Lebbon and Joe R. Lansdale - 9/10
                              "Alex" - Adam J. Nicolai - 8/10
                              "Penpal" - Dathan Auerbach - Best book I've read in awhile. - 10/10
                              "By the Light of the Gibbous Moon" - Scott Jšeger - 7.5/10

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                              • Originally posted by The Revelator View Post
                                After finishing book 4 about two months ago, I took a short break. The books in Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series are extremely long, complex, epic, and entertaining... quite heavy reading. Today I decided I had taken a long enough break and started reading book 5. With this book included, I have 10 left to go....



                                Fantasy fans MUST READ THIS SERIES
                                Cool, I've been looking for good fantasy for a while, Ordered the first 3.

                                Anyone got any good horror novel recs to start off with?

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