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The Best Splatterpunk Book

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  • The Best Splatterpunk Book

    WHat is the best splatterpunk book? If anyone out there reads books, I'd be happy to hear opinions. (I'm partial to Clive Barker's Books of Blood)
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    Life is a sexually transmitted disease, and it's 100 percent fatal

  • #2
    probably Bighead or Family Tradition, both by Ed Lee.

    I have never done drugs and I never will. I was even the best student in the D.A.R.E. program back in the 80s.

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    • #3
      Do the mods here move posts obviously in the wrong sub-forum to the right place?

      Anyway, some more "splatterpunk" books/authors I like are:

      John Skipp and Craig Spector: especially The Light at the End, The Clean-up, The Scream, The Bridge, and their work as editors for The Book of the Dead

      Joe R Lansdale: The Nightrunners, The Drive-In, and any of his multiple short-story collections (it's hard to keep track, since many of the same stories appear in multiple books)

      If Richard Laymon qualifies, then books like The Cellar, Funland, Travelling Vampire Show

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      • #4
        Splatterpunk = subgenre of horror with graphic violence, correct?

        Well...Birdman by Mo Hayder definitely falls into this category...

        Birdman – Mo Hayder



        Originally posted by Jacket
        With the forensic acumen of Patricia Cornwell and the atmosphere of Lynda La Plante''s Prime Suspect series, Birdman - already an international sensation prior to publication - introduces a troubled homicide detective battling the demons of his past while facing the psychopath of the century.

        In the chilling opening to Birdman, the bodies of five women are found, ritualistically mutilated and dumped on wasteland in Greenwich, England. When post-mortem examinations reveal a single, horrific signature linking the victims - a tiny bird sewn into each chest - the police realize they are on the trail of a serial killer with a terrifying mind.

        Detective Inspector Jack Caffery, young,driven, unshockable, finds himself facing both hostilities within the force and his own memory of a lethal failure, as he struggles to unravel the most macabre murders he''s ever seen. Now, as he employs every weapon science can offer, he knows he has little time before the sadistic killer strikes again. But he has so little evidence. All he has are five mutilated corpses and five dead little birds.

        Mo Hayder - with a keen psychological insight, brilliant forensic and procedural detail, and a psychically wounded but charismatic lead investigator - has written a first novel of raw intensity and deep understanding that will thrill the hearts of the most demanding readers of crime fiction.
        Amazon...

        I encourage you to read the reviews...the book is extremely disturbing and I enjoyed it more than The Silence of the Lambs (it's that great). Highly recommended...

        Forward, not permanent, sweet, not lasting.

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        • #5
          [QUOTE=brokenandtwisted;734584]Splatterpunk = subgenre of horror with graphic violence, correct?

          yeah, it is. Also, Clive Barker created the subgenre with Books of Blood.
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          Life is a sexually transmitted disease, and it's 100 percent fatal

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Connoseiur of Gore View Post

            yeah, it is. Also, Clive Barker created the subgenre with Books of Blood.
            I beg to differ...Octave Mirbeau did with The Torture Garden in 1899. Barker is just well known, that's all.
            Last edited by brokenandtwisted; 05-27-2007, 06:43 PM.

            Forward, not permanent, sweet, not lasting.

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            • #7
              [QUOTE=Connoseiur of Gore;734651]
              Originally posted by brokenandtwisted View Post
              Splatterpunk = subgenre of horror with graphic violence, correct?

              yeah, it is. Also, Clive Barker created the subgenre with Books of Blood.
              Barker is easily my favorite author, hands down. Whether or not he introduced "splatterpunk" (which is a very vague term anyway....does it just mean gore in book form? if so then its been around since shakespeare) doesnt really make a difference to me. Also, Ive always found it somewhat odd how many tout barker's early stuff (books of blood, cabal etc) as being so incredibly grisly. Yes, there are horrific occurences in those stories, but they are not laboriously exploited by spending pages worth of detail telling us every little bit of graphic violence. His prose acknowledges the horrors of his stories in a (for lack of a better word) classy manner; his descriptions of atrocities are weirdly beautiful, not starkly naked descriptions of gore that hit you over the head with the intent to repulse. Authors like Ed Lee (who is THE worst horror author ever) utilize such tactics, mainly because they need to pad 85% of their stories in order to fill a full legnth book. Reducing Barker to an author whose work can can be summed up as "splatterpunk" is a grave disservice. Oh, and not for nothing, but I am as big a gorehound as you'll ever meet....so its not as if im turning my nose up at the down and dirty aspects of of our genre.
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              • #8
                I liked "The Bridge" by John Skipp and Craig Spector, but "The Scream" didn't do much for me.

                I really like Poppy Z. Brite when she isn't writing about vampires. Her short story collection "Wormwood" is quite good. Her serial killer book "Exquisite Corpse" is gross as hell but not very satisfying in the end.

                If you want a good taste of the genre, which I got into about 5 years ago and burnt out on quickly, check out the two short story compilations "Splatterpunks" and "Splatterpunks 2: Over the Edge" by Paul Sammon. Some pretty intense stuff in those books.
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by brokenandtwisted View Post
                  I beg to differ...Octave Mirbeau did with The Torture Garden in 1899. Barker is just well known, that's all.
                  I've never heard of Torture Garden. I think I'll check it out.
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                  Life is a sexually transmitted disease, and it's 100 percent fatal

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                  • #10
                    American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis. Not sure if this works in the genre but the book is plenty gory. The only version that is available was supposedly edited just so it could be released. The book was banned in several countries and shrink wrapped and only sold to those over 18 in many others.

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                    • #11
                      I did some reading up on and within the splatterpunk subgenre over the summer, and from what I can gather now, Splatterpunk emerged as an alternative style in the early 80's that focused mainly on urban, antisocial culture, and had the psuedo nihilism of hardcore metal music mixed with the graphic nature of movies like the Texas chainsaw massacre, Last house on the Left, and Dawn of the Dead. I started reading in the horror genre only about a year ago, and hardcore pulp horror for me is tremendously more fun than stuff by Stephen King or Dean Koontz.
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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Connoseiur of Gore View Post
                        I've never heard of Torture Garden. I think I'll check it out.
                        You most definitely need to. It's a satire mocking the bourgeois class of nineteenth century France and the pleasure and pains of the flesh. It attempts to justice murder in the first ten or so pages. Interesting read really, I recommend a dictionary though along with it. The novel enhanced my vocabulary beyond imagination...

                        Forward, not permanent, sweet, not lasting.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by brokenandtwisted View Post
                          You most definitely need to. It's a satire mocking the bourgeois class of nineteenth century France and the pleasure and pains of the flesh. It attempts to justice murder in the first ten or so pages. Interesting read really, I recommend a dictionary though along with it. The novel enhanced my vocabulary beyond imagination...
                          Will do. Almost nothing I like better than extreme literature laced with philosophy and social criticism. God, i'm such a dork. Anyway, can anyone tell me about extreme horror books similar to Torture Garden?
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                          Life is a sexually transmitted disease, and it's 100 percent fatal

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by mrbishop77 View Post
                            I liked "The Bridge" by John Skipp and Craig Spector, but "The Scream" didn't do much for me.

                            I really like Poppy Z. Brite when she isn't writing about vampires. Her short story collection "Wormwood" is quite good. Her serial killer book "Exquisite Corpse" is gross as hell but not very satisfying in the end.

                            If you want a good taste of the genre, which I got into about 5 years ago and burnt out on quickly, check out the two short story compilations "Splatterpunks" and "Splatterpunks 2: Over the Edge" by Paul Sammon. Some pretty intense stuff in those books.

                            I've read The Scream a few times now, and it kinda grows on you. Especially if you dig the music that the book's on about like I do (hard rock/ metal).
                            Drink, si! Loco, si! But I tell you true... - Town Drunk: Imboca, Spain

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                            • #15
                              I'd still say the top splatterpunk book is probably Paul M. Sammon's Splatterpunk anthology. The first volume, specifically. I have not yet obtained the second volume, but I aim to do so in the near future.
                              “This is a place of the dead. We’re all dead here.”
                              —Ygor, Son of Frankenstein (1939)

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