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What books have re-read several times?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by capecep View Post
    Tarzan of the Apes - I love me some Tarzan.
    I have that in my iBooks but the beginning was a bit lack luster so I paused to read Jungle Book 2. Maybe I should give it a second try.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by voodoo_dolly View Post
      I have that in my iBooks but the beginning was a bit lack luster so I paused to read Jungle Book 2. Maybe I should give it a second try.
      You should. It's not very long and it's worth reading the original story for all the other versions in other media out there.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by capecep View Post
        You should. It's not very long and it's worth reading the original story for all the other versions in other media out there.
        Alright well I should be done with the jungle book in a day or so and I'll try Tarzan again.

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        • #34
          To kill a Mocking Bird and The Great Gatsby, only because they were for school. I re-read plenty boring books like How to learn french or something or how to cook for dummies the stupider version.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by voodoo_dolly View Post
            Alright well I should be done with the jungle book in a day or so and I'll try Tarzan again.
            Mowgli...quite the pivotal character within life, staring down the Shere Khan, I Will give you this Voodoo

            [YOUTUBE]0-M8xT-Vk3Y[/YOUTUBE]

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            • #36
              Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman
              Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
              Requiem For a Dream by Hubert Selby Jr
              Little Children by Tom Perrotta
              At the Mountains of Madness by HP Lovecraft

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Caustic Coffee View Post
                Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman
                Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
                Requiem For a Dream by Hubert Selby Jr
                Little Children by Tom Perrotta
                At the Mountains of Madness by HP Lovecraft
                Requiem for a dream ,that could be depressing, could give it a read...

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Shinobi37 View Post
                  Requiem for a dream ,that could be depressing, could give it a read...
                  It's depressing, but it's like beat poetry. The way its written is so lyrical you almost forget about how the characters lives are spinning down the drain.

                  Actually, most of the books I love are depressing. That probably speaks volumes about my personality.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Caustic Coffee View Post
                    It's depressing, but it's like beat poetry. The way its written is so lyrical you almost forget about how the characters lives are spinning down the drain.

                    Actually, most of the books I love are depressing. That probably speaks volumes about my personality.
                    Here's one for ya

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Shinobi37 View Post
                      Here's one for ya

                      I've actually heard a couple of people talking that book up. I'll give it a try.

                      Word of mouth is always my best source of new books.

                      Cheers.



                      Edit It's on Kindle for 5 bucks. Sold!

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                      • #41
                        I have always been interested in religion, particularly the so-called New Religious Movements (NRMs). This interest developed in my late teens whilst I was in sixth-form (16-18 education), and then throughout my time at university.

                        I have read Dark Side of the Moonies by Erica Heftmann several times, and also My Sweet Lord, by Dr Kim Knott, of Leeds University, England. The first book is critical of the MRMs, and is a personal account of one woman's experience of being (allegedly) subject to 'mind control' The second book, is written by an academic researcher, who is sypmathetic to ISKCON (popularly known as the Hare Krishna Movement). She concludes it is a sectarian form of Hinduism, and is an authentic religious option.

                        Had I have done better at uni myself, and got the funding I needed, I would have liked to have researched into this area. I wanted to examine the reaction of the British Establishment, to the NRMs as a general phenomenon.

                        One novel I have read again and again, is George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four. The themes and insights he grasped, are astonishing. Most English socialists, were highly supportive of the Soviet Revolution. But Orwell, was one of the few dissenting voices, prepared to put his neck on the line, and warn of the dangers of both communism and fascism, and state totalitarianism in general

                        RESPECT to the initiater of this thread, by the way. Very interesting.
                        Last edited by GoreShag; 07-04-2011, 06:39 AM.


                        BATH TIME BATHORY-STYLE!

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                        • #42
                          • 'Choke' by Chuck Palahniuk
                          • 'True History of the Kelly Gang' by Peter Carey
                          • 'Lolita' by Vladimir Nabokov
                          • 'Dawn of the Dumb' by Charlie Brooker
                          • 'Wuthering Heights' by Emily Bronte (probably my favorite classic gothic novel)
                          • 'The Catcher in the Rye' by J.D. Salinger
                          • 'A Clockwork Orange' by Anthony Burgess (much better than the film)
                          .

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by GoreShag View Post
                            I have always been interested in religion, particularly the so-called New Religious Movements (NRMs). This interest developed in my late teens whilst I was in sixth-form (16-18 education), and then throughout my time at university.

                            I have read Dark Side of the Moonies by Erica Heftmann several times, and also My Sweet Lord, by Dr Kim Knott, of Leeds University, England. The first book is critical of the MRMs, and is a personal account of one woman's experience of being (allegedly) subject to 'mind control' The second book, is written by an academic researcher, who is sypmathetic to ISKCON (popularly known as the Hare Krishna Movement). She concludes it is a sectarian form of Hinduism, and is an authentic religious option.

                            Had I have done better at uni myself, and got the funding I needed, I would have liked to have researched into this area. I wanted to examine the reaction of the British Establishment, to the NRMs as a general phenomenon.

                            One novel I have read again and again, is George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four. The themes and insights he grasped, are astonishing. Most English socialists, were highly supportive of the Soviet Revolution. But Orwell, was one of the few dissenting voices, prepared to put his neck on the line, and warn of the dangers of both communism and fascism, and state totalitarianism in general

                            RESPECT to the initiater of this thread, by the way. Very interesting.

                            So you've come into this interest of religious teachings and mind control, It's a fairly interesting subject, and I'm sure there are some old small cults and religions out there that tip the scale on that weirdness level. Have you read into any of the major religions ?

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Shinobi37 View Post
                              So you've come into this interest of religious teachings and mind control, It's a fairly interesting subject, and I'm sure there are some old small cults and religions out there that tip the scale on that weirdness level. Have you read into any of the major religions ?
                              My degree was in politics and religion, in a faculty of theology. The idea was to explore the interface between the two, with an interdisciplinary seminar dedicated to this in the final year.

                              There was some historical and contemporary theology involved, and social and pastoral theology too. The comparative religion element included Egyptian religion, Hindusim, Buddhism, Jainism, Zoroastrianism, Christianity and Islam.

                              There was a small part dedicated to examining some of the offshoots of the religions of the Indian sub-continent, and the extent to which some NRMs may be bona fide manifestations of their root religion.

                              But for the most part, I did a lot of reading around the subject myself. On the subject of the mind control hypothesis, I am undecided. Many of the groups that promote the idea of totalitarian indoctrination or brainwashing, often have a religious agenda themselves. Not only are avowedly pro-Christian, but they are often fiercely sectarian and demoninational as well (for example, pro-Protestant, yet anti-Catholic and anti-papist).

                              Examples are Deo Gloria Outreach (now renamed the Outreach Trust, I think), and a small organization (now defunct) whose name I forget. It's objective was "the promotion and defence of the Christian faith", and it had a publication called 'Awareness'.

                              I think all of the world's religions seek to indoctrinate to some degree. It's an area I would have liked to explored much more fully, had I got the right funding.

                              There is an excellent book, New Religious Movements: A Practical Introduction by Dr Eileen Barker, of the London School of Economics, and published by Her Majesty's Stationery Office (HMSO). She set up INFORM, the Information Network Focus on New Religious Movements.

                              Many of the 'MRMs are all freaky mind control cults' persuasion, such as the Cult Information Centre (CIC), were extremely critical of Dr Barker's publication. I have read it, and found it to be fair and objective, and perhaps more descriptive than anything.

                              I once spoke to the director of CIC, and asked him if he had any religious beliefs and agenda himself. He replied by saying he was there to deal in methodology. He then laughed, and said he sidestepped that one nicely.

                              Charming!
                              Last edited by GoreShag; 07-04-2011, 02:34 PM.


                              BATH TIME BATHORY-STYLE!

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                              • #45
                                Not really a book, but I've read Stephen Kings Rage over six times.


                                Put "2 Fast 2 Furious" in B&W and Se7en thinks he's watching a Bergman film.
                                I find the Metal Gear Solid series to be mediocre at best.

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