10 Things We Learned On The Set Of ‘Carrie’!!!

Chloe Moretz;Julianne Moore

Back in August I visited the set of Screen Gems’ new remake of Stephen King’s Carrie, directed by Kimberly Peirce (Boys Don’t Cry, Stop Loss).
My actual set visit you can find directly above this article, but I figured I’d publish a bullet point list for people who were too busy to read it right away and wanted to revisit the full report later in the day.

In theaters October 18, “A reimagining of the classic horror tale about Carrie White (Chloë Grace Moretz), a shy girl outcast by her peers and sheltered by her deeply religious mother (Julianne Moore), who unleashes telekinetic terror on her small town after being pushed too far at her senior prom.

Check it out below and look for more Carrie news out of SDCC this week!

1. It Keeps The Intense Ending Of The Book


De Palma’s 1976 film kept the carnage intimate to the dance. Here, Carrie takes on the whole town after prom (as she does in the Stephen King novella).

2. Chloe Moretz Visited Homeless Shelters To Prepare


Kimberly Peirce wanted to make sure Moretz wasn’t too confident and made her spend time with some less fortunate people for research.

3. Kimberly Peirce Almost Didn’t Take The Film


But then she realized she had a vision that differed significantly from the De Palma version.

4. “Plug It Up!


When I saw the tampons in the shower set, I knew they wouldn’t be shying away from the more horrific aspects.

5. No CGI Pig’s Blood


What we saw on set was practical.

6. Modern Technology Has Been Worked In


Says Peirce, “ it was a blast to think about humiliation and how humiliation has changed with iPhones, the internet, with posting, with websites.

7. Kubrick Was A Big Influence


I think that as much as I can, I want it to be creepy and horrifying but real horror in the Kubrick sense. I absolutely love Kubrick, because it’s so scary and it’s so weird and it’s so real; but it’s so art directed and so surreal. ~ Kimberly Peirce

8. A Lot Of The Town’s Destruction Is Practical


The VFX team used a half and half approach. Building some stuff for real and then using CG to fill in the gaps.

9. It’s Decidedly Rated “R”


Peirce on the rating, “The movie is R rated, definitely. The thing that makes me happiest is… I like violence because I like looking at it. I like looking at and understanding emotional and physical violence and how they work with one another.

10. We Get To Know The Villains More


What I saw in the book, putting the original film aside, was a chance to really develop Chris as your villain. Who is Chris? Why is she going to pick on this girl? How does that escalate?” ~ Peirce