Family Abuse and Incest In Latest ‘Jug Face’ Clip

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This Friday Gravitas Ventures releases Jug Face (read our review), the tense horror-thriller that was written and directed by Chad Crawford Kinkle. The film was produced by Andrew van den Houten (Funeral Kings, The Woman) and Robert Tonino (Home Movie, Ghoul) for Modernciné, and stars Lauren Ashley Carter (The Woman), Sean Bridgers (Deadwood), Sean Young (Blade Runner), Larry Fessenden (I Sell the Dead) and Daniel Manche (The Girl Next Door). The film was executive produced by Lucky McKee, Arrien Schiltkamp and Loren Semmens. Jug face won the Slamdance Grand Prize Screenwriting Award in 2011 and debuted as a Special Screening selection at this year’s festival.

Now on VOD platforms, the film is also now in limited theaters from Modernciné’s new distribution outfit Modern Distributors.

Ada, her family and a small isolated backwoods community worship a mysterious pit. The pit has the power to heal and protect all who honor it but at a deadly price…it demands an occasional sacrifice. The pit communicates through the local potter who, while in a trance, crafts ceramic jugs that carry the face of a person to be sacrificed to the entity that lives within it. Ada has a secret about the latest jug face that she’s determined to keep hidden but the pit demands a sacrifice and unleashes an evil onto the community until it gets who it really wants.

In addition, the score and original motion picture soundtrack for the film is by indie music veteran Sean Spillane, best known for providing the soundtrack to The Woman. It is now available, and as a way to thank fans for all the support leading up to today’s theatrical and national VOD release, Modernciné and Modern Distributors are making the soundtrack available to the public via Soundcloud for the next 24 hours! After that (or now), you can find it on iTunes, Amazon, as well as other retailers.

  • markajacoby

    In a world full of Saw and Paranomal 18′s, useless remakes, and other crap, Jugface was a pleasant and unexpected joy. While I wish they would have focused a little more on the human interactions (which were friggin scary enough) and stayed away from the paranormal (which got a little cheesy) I give these guys huge kudos for being creative, trying something that wasn’t formulaic, and getting the most out of everything they could.