Review: “Drumhellar” # 4

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Riley Rossmo and Alex Link’s “Drumhellar” hits peak insanity. For any other book this would be troublesome, or at least inspire some worry in the audience. Here, it works wonders. The mystery of the narrative deepens and the plot proves that just about anything is possible. The right mix of humor and the paranormal come together this month to make the series’ strongest chapter since its debut.


WRITTEN BY: Riley Rossmo & Alex Link
ART BY: Riley Rossmo
PUBLISHER: Image
PRICE: $3.50
RELEASE: February 5, 2014

I wish I could talk about each and every insane development this month, but that would spoil the fun. This book never ceases to amaze me. What starts off as a issue ripe with jokes on prison culture quickly descends into a surreal mess as everything your imagination can muster wanders into the narrative.

Yet, it all works thanks to the incredible work of Rossmo and Link. The early issues spent considerable time setting up a world where anything is possible. Although Drum finds himself amongst the mundane walls of a jail cell, the book doesn’t falter, instead it flourishes. It is a hard task to outdo yourself in the weirdness department from month to month, but somehow “Drumhellar” does it time and again.

Rossmo’s art is something that completely transcends the pages of this book. Forget the strangeness within each of the panels. The floating babies, or ghost dinosaurs. The real marveling should be done at his full page spreads. They are so dynamic, so shattering in their beauty, that they command you. They burst with color and vibrancy. The “nutmeg” sequence comes to mind. Turning the page made me gasp. You need to see this stuff.

I was worried that “Drumhellar” was hitting a slump by throwing Drum into a jail cell. It was actually the exact shot of energy the book needed to reacquaint itself with the weird. This issue makes “Eraserhead” look like a Sunday drive. It channels a surreal look at the world that is both chilling and casual. It’s impossible to recognize anywhere else in comics right now.

I still don’t really have any clue where anything is headed. However, given engaging characters and a true sense of surprise with every issue it hardly matters. This book is highly entertaining and has such a unique voice. Its impossible to explain the narrative to anyone. Yet, flipping the book open and showcasing some of the art should be reason alone for people to jump in.

“Drumhellar” defies explanation. It’s steeped in a mysterious world that plays by its own rules and never ceases to impress. This acid soaked adventure through the metaphysical world that isn’t concerned with answers just yet.

Rating: 4.5/5 Skulls.