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‘Southbound’ to Open New York’s Scary Movie 9 Film Festival

SOUTHBOUND

The horror anthology film Southbound, which made its premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival, will open the Scary Movie 9 Film Festival in New York City at the Film Society Lincoln Center. The film’s premiere is Friday, October 30th, 7:30pm.

This knock-down drag-out road movie puts the pedal to the metal as it speeds down a lost highway to hell with five separate but neatly connected stories of terror and menace that will take you on a wild ride you won’t soon forget. The action ties together the grim and bloody tales of two men on the run from a nameless menace, an all-girl rock group who break down in the desert and get a lift from some too-good-to-be-true Samaritans, a businessman trying to save the life of the woman he’s run down, a gun-toting roughneck who bursts into a bar in search of his long-lost sister, and a family whose vacation becomes a terrifying ordeal. Another mind-bending work from many of the makers of V/H/S and featuring the voice of Larry Fessenden as the radio DJ, Southbound is the rare anthology movie with no weak links.

Southbound, produced by our very own editor-in-chief, Brad Miska, features segments directed by Roxanne Benjamin, David Bruckner, Patrick Horvath, and Radio Silence, many of whom directed segments for the V/H/S films.

The Scary Movie 9 festival also includes such titles as Baskin, The Devil’s Candy, Cherry Tree, and more.

The 9th edition of Scary Movies (October 30 – November 5) opens with the mind-bending Southbound, an anthology road film from some of the key players behind V/H/S, followed by a blow-out Halloween bash where prizes will be given for the best costume. The fright fest showcases 12 of the best new horror titles, including Sean Byrne’s follow-up to The Loved Ones, The Devil’s Candy, and the gut-wrenching Australian feral-dog thriller The Pack, plus horror movies of all stripes from Ireland, Denmark, Spain, and Turkey. Revival offerings include Juan Piquer Simón’s ’80s cult classics Pieces and Slugs, a free screening of James Whale’s essential Frankenstein as part of Lincoln Center’s campus-wide Halloween celebration for kids, and a 35mm screening of the Hammer gem The Gorgon in tribute to the dearly departed Christopher Lee. The Film Society is also thrilled to present evenings with Larry Fessenden, whose company Glass Eye Pix is celebrating its 30th anniversary, and Bernard Rose, whose new film, Frankenstein, a wildly original update set on the streets of L.A., closes this year’s festival with large doses of both heart and gore. Scary Movies is programmed by Laura Kern, Rufus de Rham, and Gavin Smith.

On the occasion of Cohen Media Group’s release of Kent Jones’s Hitchcock/Truffaut, the Film Society of Lincoln Center presents a two-day event (October 27 & 28) featuring a sneak preview of Jones’s documentary, in which leading filmmakers such as Martin Scorsese, David Fincher, James Gray, and Olivier Assayas unpack the legacy of François Truffaut’s canonical interview with Alfred Hitchcock, to be followed by a discussion with Jones about the book that helped to establish the Master of Suspense as the legendary figure he is today. This event will also feature a selection of films directed by Hitchcock—the director’s penultimate silent film The Manxman; the undervalued I Confess, starring Montgomery Clift and Anne Baxter; and wrong-man thrillers Frenzy and Saboteur—adding up to what should be a can’t-miss celebration of one of cinema’s most towering artists.

Hitchcock/Truffaut tickets will go on sale October 8. Scary Movies 9 tickets will go on sale October 15, with early access for Members starting October 13. See more and save with a Scary Movies All Access Pass or a 3+ film discount package. Special pricing may apply at select evenings.

Ticket information can be found here.



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COMMENTS

1 Comment
  • Liked the majority of this when we saw it at TIFF. In our review we highlight the second story in particular – an almost entirely-solo effort – for its uniqueness and tension. As far as anthologies go, it’s pretty solid.

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