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The Strange Colour of Your Body's Tears

Described as a Giallo-inspired sexual horror-thriller, Tears turns on Dan (Klaus Tange) who returns to his Brussels home from a business trip and finds out his wife, Edwige (Ursula Bedena), has gone missing somewhere in his Art Nouveau-styled apartment building.

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[TIFF '13 Review] Mike Says 'The Strange Colour of Your Body's Tears' Isn't Fooling Anyone...

I’m a pretty huge fan of Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani’s Amer, a giallo-inspired slasher that was well received in the festival circuit. The duo is back again with The Strange Colour of Your Body’s Tears, which played at the ongoing Toronto International Film Festival. While the buzz was pretty strong, the teaser and available imagery sort of looked like they hadn’t done anything new. Our interview with Cattet and Forzani proved Strange Colour was yet another giollo story, this time from another sex’s perspective – something I found quite interesting. Unfortunately, Mike Pereira comes out of the fest with an extremely negative review, basically calling it out…

On the surface it sounds like vintage giallo but the plot is soon caught up in needless, incoherence (huge understatement),” he says in his review. “It took me right out of the picture.

This is pretentious with a capital P,” he adds before giving this heavy warning: “If you’ve managed to go through your entire life not viewing a single giallo, this is the last place to start. I’d say avoid like the plague. It would scare off anyone who’d ever had the remote interest of seeing one.

Even though Mike hated the movie, he does give props to Cattet and Forzani for their filmmaking ability: “It successfully captures the audio/visual beauty of those films [giallo] and that’s about it,” he explains. “[They] are obviously super-talented which makes this nonsense all the more frustrating.READ MORE

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[BD Review] 'The Strange Colour Of Your Body's Tears' Is A Pretentious Waste Of Undeniable Talent

The Italian-born giallo thriller is the perfect embodiment of everything I adore about the cinema. In this world, style reigns supreme. Characteristics include a murder mystery element, brutal violence, dreamlike visuals, and an elaborate soundtrack. The antagonist’s identity (including sex) is concealed by a black hat, gloves and trench coat. That’ll all be revealed in the third act. Iconic giallos include such titles as Blood and Black Lace, Don’t Torture a Duckling, The Bird with the Crystal Plumage, Deep Red and Tenebre. In 2009, filmmaking duo Hélène Cattet, Bruno Forzani brought us an ode to the genre with the cult favorite, Amer. For their sophomore feature, they’ve returned to this inspiration with The Strange Colour of your Body’s Tears. The title alone is enough to elicit excitement out of long-time fans. I was going into this hoping for a continuation of this revival. Alas, it actually could do the exact opposite.

The Strange Colour of your Body’s Tears is about a husband who comes home to discover that his wife has gone missing. He and detective begin investigating the apartment building only to find out that the place and its residents have their fair share of secrets. The cast look like they were photo-shopped right out of those films. They’re perfectly in tune to the filmmakers’ vision. The cinematography is flat-out gorgeous. Every shot, every lighting scheme has been meticulously devised. The artistry on display is without question. The terrific soundtrack is compiled from other films of that era. It syncs perfectly with the imagery and helps to create the feel of the genre. I also adored the expertly-crafted sound design. It’s every bit as stylized as the visuals themselves. This is A/V craftsmanship of the highest calibre.

On the surface it sounds like vintage giallo but the plot is soon caught up in needless, incoherence (huge understatement). It took me right out of the picture. If you look real hard, you’ll see the workings of a semi-coherent story within all the babble. Worse; there are sequences that go on endlessly with a motif not unlike a music video. The dream within a dream thing will test viewer’s patience like never before. The filmmakers push this so hard to a point where I couldn’t help but to laugh out loud. This breaking point happens during the half way mark and consumed me (and some other folks) for the rest of the duration. It’s been awhile since I couldn’t contain myself during a theatrical screening. Unfortunately this isn’t intentional. I was amused for all the wrong reasons. This is pretentious with a capital P. While I’m more than sure there are audiences who appreciate what The Strange Colour of your Body’s Tears sets out to do, personally I can’t get involved in a mystery where a) I have no idea what the hell is going on and b) I don’t care whatsoever what happens to the characters. All of this seems like a waste to me if I’m not invested in what’s underneath all of the showboating.

If you’ve managed to go through your entire life not viewing a single giallo, this is the last place to start. I’d say avoid like the plague. It would scare off anyone who’d ever had the remote interest of seeing one. It successfully captures the audio/visual beauty of those films and that’s about it. The Strange Colour of your Body’s Tears is an immense disappoint. I have a fondness for art-house pictures but this doesn’t do them any service. It plays out like a parody and contains all the things that give them a bad rap. The Strange Colour of your Body’s Tears is an arrogant, incoherent piece of drivel. Cattet and Forzani are obviously super-talented which makes this nonsense all the more frustrating.

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Exclusive

[TIFF '13 Interview] 'Strange Colour of Your Body's Tears' Authentic Giallo Horror!

One of the most celebrated films out of the ongoing Toronto International Film Festival is Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani’s The Strange Colour of Your Body’s Tears, a follow-up Giallo film to their gorgeous Amer that also taps into the classic Italian subgenre. In fact, the duo explain that the two films are like brother and sister. In the following interview, they’ll explain to you how…

Now playing at various festivals, including TIFF, here’s the plot of Strange Colour, starring : “A woman vanishes. Her husband inquires into the strange circumstances of her disappearance. Did she leave him? Is she dead? As he goes along searching, he plunges into a world of nightmare and violence…READ MORE

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An Exclusive Look At One Of The Best 'The ABCs of Death' Shorts, "D is for Dogfight"!

Now in limited theaters and VOD platforms everywhere is Magnet’s The ABCs of Death, the perfect movie for a group outing this weekend.

We’ve been provided with an exclusive clip from the anthology, which comes from Deadgirl director Marcel Sarmiento’s incredible “D is for Dogfight.” Watch as man fights beast for the ultimate revenge.

In this mega-anthology, “Twenty-six directors. Twenty-six ways to die. The ABCs of Death is perhaps the most ambitious anthology film ever conceived with productions spanning fifteen countries and featuring segments directed by over two dozen of the world’s leading talents in contemporary genre film. Inspired by children’s educational books, the motion picture is comprised of twenty-six individual chapters, each helmed by a different director assigned a letter of the alphabet. The directors were then given free reign in choosing a word to create a story involving death.

Jon Schnepp, Anders Morgenthaler, Ben Wheatley, Ti West, Nacho Vigalondo, Jake West, Banjong Pisanthanakun, Xavier Gens, Adam Wingard, Marcel Sarmiento, Kaare Andrews, Noboru Iguchi, Yoshihiro Nishimura, Angela Bettis, Yūdai Yamaguchi, Mikael Wulff, Thomas Cappelen Malling, Jorge Michel Grau, Simon Rumley, Ernesto Díaz Espinoza, Srdjan Spasojevic, Hélène Cattet, Bruno Forzani, Jason Eisener, Andrew Traucki, Adrián García Bogliano, Timo Tjahjanto and Lee Hardcastle all took part! READ MORE

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Chat With The 'ABC's Of Death' Directors On Reddit Today!

Now on VOD platforms everywhere is Magnet’s The ABCs of Death, which will also receive a limited theatrical run set for March 8. If you haven’t seen it yet, it’s worth a look. If you have seen it – you may have some questions! Either way you’re encouraged to chat with with directors today on Reddit at 11AM PST – 2PM PST. Which means it starts in like two hours!

Participating talent include Nacho Vigalondo (A is for Apocalypse), Adrian Garcia Bogliano (B is for Bigfoot), Ernesto Diaz Espinoza (C is for Cycle), Marcel Sarmiento (D is for Dogfight), Thomas Malling (H is for Hydro-Electric Diffusion), Jorge Michel Grau (I is for Ingrown), Simon Rumley (P is for Pressure), Adam Wingard (Q is for Quack), Srdjan Spasojevic (R is for Removed), Lee Hardcastle (T is for Toilet), Ben Wheatley (U is for Unearthed), Kaare Andrews (V is for Vagitus), Jon Schnepp (W is for WTF), Xavier Gens (X is for XXL), Jason Eisener (Y is for Youngbuck), Ant Timpson (co-producer), and Tim League (co-producer).

Simply log in to Reddit between 11AM and 2PM PST (2PM and 5PM EST) and leave your comment to receive answers in real time!

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Special Video Featurette For 'The ABCs of Death'!

Now on VOD platforms everywhere is Magnet’s The ABCs of Death, which will also receive a limited theatrical run set for March 8. Airing on cablers now, we’ve just shared a fun featurette that features interviews with the various filmmaking talents involved.

In this mega-anthology, “Twenty-six directors. Twenty-six ways to die. The ABCs of Death is perhaps the most ambitious anthology film ever conceived with productions spanning fifteen countries and featuring segments directed by over two dozen of the world’s leading talents in contemporary genre film. Inspired by children’s educational books, the motion picture is comprised of twenty-six individual chapters, each helmed by a different director assigned a letter of the alphabet. The directors were then given free reign in choosing a word to create a story involving death.

Jon Schnepp, Anders Morgenthaler, Ben Wheatley, Ti West, Nacho Vigalondo, Jake West, Banjong Pisanthanakun, Xavier Gens, Adam Wingard, Marcel Sarmiento, Kaare Andrews, Noboru Iguchi, Yoshihiro Nishimura, Angela Bettis, Yūdai Yamaguchi, Mikael Wulff, Thomas Cappelen Malling, Jorge Michel Grau, Simon Rumley, Ernesto Díaz Espinoza, Srdjan Spasojevic, Hélène Cattet, Bruno Forzani, Jason Eisener, Andrew Traucki, Adrián García Bogliano, Timo Tjahjanto and Lee Hardcastle all took part! READ MORE

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First Look At 'Amer' Director's 'The Strange Colour of Your Body’s Tears'

Amer, the Giallo-inspired work of Hélène Cattet and Bruno Forzani, is something to behold. A beautiful and shocking film that didn’t get the recognition it deserved.

With Berlin heating up, Bloody landed an exclusive first look at Cattet and Forzani’s follow-up, The Strange Colour of Your Body’s Tears, which we learned stars Klaus Tange, Jean-Michel Vovk, Sylvia Camarda, Sam Louwyck and Anna D’Annunzio.

A woman vanishes.
Her husband inquires into the strange circumstances of her disappearance.
Did she leave him? Is she dead?
As he goes along searching, he plunges into a world of nightmare and violence…

Get your hands all over the still below! READ MORE

[BD Review] 'The ABCs of Death' A Short Film Festival With Mixed Results

Having been to dozens of film festival shorts programs I know just how excruciating they can be. This was my only reservation heading into Magnet’s The ABCs of Death, which premiered at the Midnight Madness portion of the Toronto International Film Festival. When the 2+hour “event” concluded, that’s when my brain really started to hurt. How the hell do I review this? Do I review it based on the overall experience, the ratio of good to bad shorts, or do I review each short individually? Ultimately, I feel that since it’s presented as a film experience, it should be reviewed as one.

The concept behind ABCs is brilliant: 26 directors were each given $5,000 (according to “Q is for Quack”) and had to deliver a short film about death. The result is an eclectic variety of horror that range from sex-fueled murder to rape revenge. It may sound delectable, but it’s not. It’s hard to know exactly where the problem festers, but I’d like to speculate that it was the intense creative freedom given to the directors. The overall problem is a lack of cohesion, meaning, there’s nothing to connect all of the shorts.* I wonder what kind of small guidelines may have been implemented that would have strung all 26 shorts together a little bit? I don’t blame the producers at Drafthouse (as the idea is brilliant), but nobody could have speculated what the final result of the experiment would feel like… It was tedious.

Part of the problem is that, like any other shorts program, a lot of the shorts weren’t very good. Furthermore, nobody could have guessed that most of the directors would take a dark and/or artistic path. The few comedic moments presented such a wonderful breath of fresh air in a 2-hour project jam-packed with intense depression. It’s even more frustrating that the producers were able to land such high caliber directors who mostly took the perspective of a film student – meaning, instead of really showing what they could do with $5k, they did only what they could with $5k (the bare minimum). That’s not much to work with, and the challenge is great, but the competition was fierce. Wouldn’t you want to show up the other directors? And while a few of the shorts went big, they still managed to bore; albeit, it’s HARD to tell a compelling story, without shocks, in under 5 minutes.

Even through the film’s best shorts – directed by Marcel Sarmiento, Timo Tjahjanto, Adam Wingard, Simon Barrett, Hélène Cattet, Bruno Forzani, Jason Eisner and Ben Wheatley – the project just felt overtly long and fragmented. The problem reviewing such a film is that, while some of the shorts warranted a perfect score, others deserved much less. How to you fairly grade the entirety of a project that’s a quarter brilliant, a quarter OK, and half incredibly weak? I’d suggest you ignore the below rating (it’s undeniably misleading) and focus on creating some sort of party atmosphere to watch ABCs of Death. The only thing that can kick-start some energy into this anthology is you, and a group of screaming and laughing friends. There’s plenty here worth seeing.

*Editor’s Note: In the interest of full disclosure, I produced V/H/S, another anthology released by Magnet. My opinions may be construed as biased.