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Why the Last 10 Minutes of ‘Gerald’s Game’ Elevate the Film to Greatness

Why the Last 10 Minutes of ‘Gerald’s Game’ Elevate the Film to Greatness

1 room, 2 incredible performances, and a director who just became a master. Gerald’s Game, an adaptation of the Stephen King novel, is the best horror movie of the year.

If you haven’t seen it, watch it immediately. If you have, let’s dig deep into it.

Speaking with director Mike Flanagan (Oculus, Hush) this week, our own Trace Thurman touched upon the most controversial aspect of Gerald’s Game: the conclusion. As Trace noted, Stephen King fans have had gripes with the ending of the story ever since the novel was published back in 1992, and many are none too pleased that Flanagan did not alter it for his Netflix adaptation.

As Flanagan explained to Trace, he wouldn’t have made the film any other way.

It was something when I read the book that I loved,” said Flanagan, when Trace asked about the final 10 minutes. “I know it was polarizing with fans of the book, so the people that hated that epilogue in the book are going to hate it in the movie. I fully expect that [the epilogue is] going to be the lightning rod for people to be like ‘Oh I was so into it and then (groans) that ending.’ But that’s what happened in the book. There was never a time where it felt right to do the film without that ending, for better or worse.

Of course, if you’ve seen the film, you know that the last 10 minutes take place some time after Jessie (a transcendent Carla Gugino) has escaped from her nightmare situation; in one of the hardest-to-watch sequences in recent horror history, she gruesomely mutilates her hand to break free from the handcuffs her (dead) husband put on her.

And then, in the final 10 minutes of Gerald’s Game, which King wrote out in the last 50 pages of the novel, Jessie writes a letter to her own self as a child. Through this letter, we learn that Jessie has still been having nightmares about the Moonlight Man, a humanoid creature that she had nightly visions of during her extended stay on the bed that almost became her final resting place.

But what we learn next really takes the story to another level. As it turns out, the Moonlight Man was *not* a delusion inside of Jessie’s mind, as we (and she) had assumed up until that point. Rather, the perceived manifestation of death was an actual man named Raymond Andrew Joubert, a graveyard vandalist and necrophiliac who really did make nightly visits to Jessie’s bedside.

If you’re asking me, that makes those visits infinitely more bone-chilling. Seriously. Watch the film again, armed with the knowledge that he’s real. Yikes.

In the very final moments of Flanagan’s Gerald’s Game, Jessie confronts Joubert in court. She bravely approaches him, delivering a single, powerful line before turning her back on the monster in much the same way Nancy did to Freddy at the end of A Nightmare on Elm Street: “You’re so much smaller than I remember,” Jessie says to her Moonlight Man.

It’s in this moment that Gerald’s Game becomes so much more than a survival horror story about a woman chained to a bed. In these final 10 minutes, Gerald’s Game transforms from terrifying horror film into a truly powerful piece of drama, much the same way Jessie transforms from terrified victim into powerful survivor.

The Moonlight Man looks so much smaller because Jessie is now so much bigger.

Her last line, ‘you’re so much smaller than I remember,’ is also a callback to the very first line we ever hear Young Jessie say in the first flashback, about the lakehouse,” Flanagan noted to me when I talked to him about the meaning of the film. “She says ‘It’s so much smaller than I remember…’ and her father articulates the point of the film: ‘That’s ‘cuz you’re bigger.’ THAT was always the point of this film to me, and that symmetry — which a lot of people miss — summed up the whole film for me.”

We learn throughout the course of Gerald’s Game that Jessie’s father sexually abused her as a child, long before her husband insisted on calling himself daddy and asserting his physical dominance over her. As Flanagan himself noted in the aforementioned chat with Trace, Jessie has been dealing with “male perversion” in “various forms from various people throughout her life,” all of which is embodied in Raymond Andrew Joubert – a man every bit as ugly as all who abuse women truly are on the inside.

When Jessie turns her back on Joubert, she’s turning her back on her father. On her husband. On all of the abuse that she’s been subjected to throughout her entire life. She’s made the decision to no longer run away from or bury her trauma deep within herself. She literally faces it head on, robbing everyone who’s ever hurt her of the power of harming her any further.

And that’s the story being told in Gerald’s Game, from the very beginning. The entire movie, past and present, masterfully builds to that transformative moment of catharsis. It’s a story about a traumatized little girl who grew up to be a scared woman. It’s the story of that woman overcoming the demons of her past to take back her life by choosing to no longer live under the oppression that’s been an ever-present aspect of her being since she was a child.

That decades-spanning story/character arc, seen through to a pitch-perfect conclusion, is one of the most powerful and emotional that Stephen King has ever written. And it’s because Mike Flanagan and co-writer Jeff Howard stick true to King’s ending, despite 25 years of readers complaining about it, that Gerald’s Game is one of the most impactful horror films in many years.

Gerald’s Game is important, masterful horror cinema. And I’d personally hate to imagine the film without the final 10 minutes that have proven to be so polarizing. Without those 10 minutes, the film, while it may be a terrifying and intense horror movie up to that point, doesn’t actually mean anything. It’s merely a scary story. And Gerald’s Game excels by being so much more than that.

It’s much bigger than one woman’s story. And Flanagan hits that out of the park.



AROUND THE WEB


COMMENTS

122 Comments
  • Ocelot006 .

    Sometimes it’s best to change the endings of Stephen King’s works. The Lifetime Channel with a monster lost me.

  • Cheddar Hayes

    Pretentious much

  • adam washington

    Excellent article. I’m a huge fan of Mike Flanagan and his work with Gerald’s Game proves he’s one of the best horror directors of all time. Can’t wait to see what he does next!

    • jasonlives1986

      All time? I wish I could see the 3 losers who agreed with that

      • adam washington

        Normally, I’m not an asshole, but I clearly said “he’s one of the best horror directors of all time” which doesn’t mean “he’s the best horror director of all time.” There are other horror directors out there who are putting in the work and doing what they can to entertain audiences.

        Also, who cares if four or more people liked the comment? Does that trigger you or something? What would you do if you did find out who liked the comment? Not a damn thing? Exactly.

        • jasonlives1986

          He’s not. You’re wrong. Move on. No need to be a asshole about it.

          I’d publicly shame them too for that opinion.

          • @festy1986:disqus Mike Flanagan is the best horror director of ALL TIME, and you’re easily the worst commenter in this thread. Three posts and you’ve only been a douche to the author and others.

          • jasonlives1986

            This is of course your opinion.

          • Artman009

            If anyone’s being the asshole, it’s you.

          • jasonlives1986

            Naw. Mike isn’t one of the best directors out there and he through a hissy fit over it.

          • adam washington

            Responding/refuting your chumpy argument isn’t throwing a hissy fit, but I guess you wouldn’t much about arguments, much less discussing horror films/directors with anyone.

          • jasonlives1986

            It was a bad ending. It’s not Flanagans fault. It’s Stephen king. He can’t write and ending for shit.

            That said. I lol at your opinion of him being one of the best directors ever. So What? Deal with it.

          • adam washington

            You’ve yet to prove me wrong though. According to you, who is the best horror director of all time OR who else would surpass Mike Flanagan in terms of horror direction? I’ll wait.

            Oh no, you’re gonna publicly shame people on the internet. Whatever will they do? Please. Might wanna take your internet tough guy act somewhere else because no one’s fooled by it.

          • jasonlives1986

            You’re pretty sift. Thats what I’ve noticed. You wanted to be macho and bait me into saying if best someone up or something. That’s on you.

            You’re entitled to you opinion and it’s cool.

            And I’m entitled to mine.

            If Flanagan is on your mount Rushmore of horror directors than it really says all that needs to be said about the credibility if the argument.

          • adam washington

            I’m certain you didn’t use the right word (i.e. sift means something else entirely), but that’s okay. We all make mistakes. Aside from that, I’m not being macho. I clearly haven’t threatened you or anyone connected to you, so what the hell are you talking about?

            “If Flanagan is on your Mount Rushmore of horror directors…” – at this point, it’s laughably bad how you made that shit up when I clearly said that Flanagan was one of the best, meaning that there are other horror film directors that I like. For example, James Wan, John Carpenter’s old movies, Sam Raimi, and so on.

            And you got some nerve talking about credibility of an argument when you can’t intelligently argue for shit + you lost credibility the moment you got butthurt about people agreeing with me and threatened to “publicly shame them” like you’re some chumpy doxxer.

          • jasonlives1986

            I apologize for any wrong doing I caused you. It was unintentional and I’m sympathetic to my mistake.

          • adam washington

            I wouldn’t consider it to be “wrongdoing” because it was just an argument between two people. It’s water under the bridge for me now. Have a good day, haha.

        • MrX13

          Dude, don’t even worry about it. You got 9 like so far on your comment so people do agree with you, me being one of them.

          • adam washington

            Yeah, I shouldn’t worry about it, but I’m also the type of person who doesn’t take shit from anyone, including some butthurt commenter, haha.

    • MrX13

      Flanagan has done some really good film work prior to Geralds Game. One really is Hush, that was a brilliant movie and the actress (his wife) was superb. One of my favorites

      • adam washington

        “Hush” is also one of my favorite films too. I sure wonder what Mike’s future projects will consist of.

        • MrX13

          Not sure but I look forward to his next project

          • adam washington

            Same here. In the meantime, I’m excited for films like The Raid 3, The Foreigner, and so on. Those films, I’m sure, will be dope.

          • MrX13

            Yeah definitely looking forward to those movies you mentioned. Chan vs Brosnan!

          • adam washington

            I remember watching the trailer for “The Foreigner” and it looks epic, but I pray it really is though. I’d hate for the film to suck. Also, there’s supposedly going to be a Rush Hour 4, but only if Chris Tucker agrees to it.

          • MrX13

            I would like to watch another Rush Hour..only if Tucker and Chan agree with it.

          • adam washington

            Right, Chan agreed to do the fourth film, but him and the studio behind the development want Tucker to come back because they don’t see anyone else partnering with Chan on the stunts/comedic moments.

          • MrX13

            Plus, Tucker doesn’t have anything to do so why not

    • ChowYunPhat

      I don’t know if I’d say all time yet, but he’s definitely one of the best working today. The guy has taken quite a few movies that seemed like a no-win proposal and turned them into good to great films.

      • adam washington

        I agree. Flanagan’s work impresses me. Of course, I made the mistake of adding “of all time” when there are other horror directors who’ve been in the game longer + have more films on their roster (good and bad), but I can’t deny the fact that I wanna see more of Flanagan’s work.

  • Mr. Red Right Hand

    “best horror film of the year” that’s quite a stretch. it’s a decent watch, but you’d never watch it again.

  • Frank Gambino

    It was ok.

  • marshally

    Not impressed, dammit.

  • jasonlives1986

    Stuff like this one feels you’re on the payroll.

    Good movie. Better than IT even but come on. Mike becomes transcendent and the last 10 mins makes this movie revolutionary? Relax

    • A) He said Carla is transcendent.
      B) Is it unfathomable that we just really like a movie and want to write about it? We don’t get paid to write articles unless it’s a sponsored post, and when it is sponsored we point it out in the article.

      • jasonlives1986

        We all get paid. One way or other.

        • Really not understanding your response here. But if you would like to choose to believe that we are lying then that is your prerogative.

          • jasonlives1986

            I’m choosing to believe that the ending of this movie was garbage and I disagree with the articles premise.

            That is all

          • ChowYunPhat

            Lot’s of people disagree, but they’re able to do it without being a raging dick.

          • jasonlives1986

            I wasn’t.

            I was assertive in my opinion. I’ve moved on and so should you.

  • Eric

    Good movie, really enjoyed it, horror movie of the year…meh!

  • Papa_spoosh

    It’s a particularly great year for horror which is awesome. I loved this movie, but it’s not better than get out.

  • Jordan KO

    Just watched the movie, it was okay. That ending was nothing special at all.

  • Rofair

    “Greatness” is becoming such an overused word on this site that it hardly holds any meaning anymore.

    I liked the movie though.

    • biff

      Yeah, it’s kind of sad that horror fans (I very much include myself among them) are always so anxious to append the “great” grade to films as they arrive, but that’s due to the amount of passion involved. Unfortunately, it’s a given that horror films, seen as a stock in trade, are often the lowest rung on the ladder, and not usually given the financial or creative backing the latest Tom Cruise vehicle (let’s just not talk about the Mummy thing, shall we?) does. The “true” horror fans are the ones who know that those limitations are overcome by a clear vision and concept — obviously John Carpenter’s Halloween and the late, great Tobe Hooper’s Texas Chainsaw Massacre –immediately come to mind. These films come few and far between, but clearly raised the bar when it came to truly terrifying their audiences, but due to sheer cojones, more than anything. Guys like Mike Flanagan are certainly seen as being cut from the same fabric, someone who has the passion and intelligence to create “greatness”, but while in my opinion he hasn’t yet, I really can’t wait for when he does.

  • Matt Graupman

    I loved “Gerald’s Game” and I think the ending was appropriate, especially considering the symmetry that Flanagan was going for (I definitely prefer Jessie’s final line to the spitting she does in the book). I’ll even concede that “Gerald’s Game” is a better film than “IT” (“IT” was more entertaining because it was a blockbuster popcorn horror flick, while “Gerald’s Game” is much creepier and better constructed). Still, calling it the “best horror film of the year” is a little bit of a stretch (and this is coming from a HUGE Flanagan fan; I think “Hush” is absolutely brilliant); for me, “Get Out” is still the movie to beat for that title.

    • Agreed that the courtroom scene works better without the spit, even though I remember feeling a high sense of catharsis at that in the book.

      • krisp8888

        What?! She spat in his face in the book?! That would have ruined the entire ending for me! Glad Mike changed that. I found Jessie’s final line to be incredibly powerful.

  • MrX13

    Great movie and great performance by Gugino! Everything was done perfectly for this movie

    • Necro

      Yep all the stars aligned for this project.

  • Robert

    I have to respectfully disagree. Jessie wasn’t empowered, she merely survived by the grace of Joubert’s decision not to kill/eat her when given the chance. And wasn’t Gerald her Sugar Daddy? There’s no reason to doubt that Jessie would have stayed with him had he not had a heart attack. And let’s be honest, the courtroom scene was silly.

    I agree, a really good/entertaining movie. But great? Meh

    • biff

      Strictly from the film, I think the idea Flanagan had about the courtroom scene — that her confrontation with the Moonlight Man was also with all the men who had loomed over her life — was important for her character. Also, given the internal commentary, as well as her initial reactions to Gerald’s stunt, I believe Jessie would’ve had a major re-think of her relationship with him, at least. But his survival doesn’t work thematically, so there’s that. All in all though, I agree — it’s a damn good movie (I immediately compare it to the TV adaptation of Dean Koontz’s Intensity, with Molly Parker and the brilliant John C. McGinley), but not necessarily “great”.

    • mikowilson

      Agreed. If there was any kind of transformation of character it happened during the years in her prologue. What I can’t see, I can’t appreciate.
      What I saw in the movie was a woman surviving men, but not actually making the change out of victomhood.
      If that’s what the scene at the end was supposed to represent, it was hollow without actually seeing real change.

  • Dr. Sam “Looney” Loomis

    Henry Thomas was a helluva lot creepier than the Moonlight Man. Phone home, Chester!

  • Necro

    I’ve watched it twice now and loved it even more the second time! Flanagan did a phenomenal job with it! But a very perplexing question came to my mind after my second viewing, and that was would I have loved the movie as much as I do had I never read the book? After a brief deliberation I firmly believe that I would like it even more, especially not knowing what to expect. Man that situation alone would fucking suck! On a sidenote with the very loose talk about a possible ‘Pet Semetary’ reboot and Andy Muscietti avidly saying his desire to do the project, after seeing Flanagan’s latest triumph and Andy’s killer ‘IT’ film, which director would be best suited for that project? That’s of course assuming Flanagan would have any interest at all in doing that. Both directors did phenomenal jobs with their latest Stephen King adaptations and both would be very intriguing to see what they would bring to that film. IMO

    • John Squires

      I knew NOTHING about Gerald’s Game prior to watching the movie over the weekend, which made for a really awesome experience. The story went to places that I NEVER expected, and I’m so glad nothing was spoiled by the marketing.

      • Necro

        Oh man I would kill to be able to experience the film in that way! Pretty much how you felt after watching it is how I felt the first time after reading it! I waited 11 years for this film and Flanagan crushed it!

        • Joel C

          Just a bad realization of the thing in her room though. Very different vision of it in the book that was so much scarier than the Lurch looking thing in the movie.

          • Necro

            Yeah King’s description of it made it sound much more sinister.

    • Dylan Gutierrez

      Flanagan in my opinion would be better suited though a collaboration of the two would be heaven.

      • Necro

        You know I was watching Clive Barker’s ‘Nightbreed’ last night and being that I’m a huge fan of his and the fact that David Cronenberg stars in the film as the sick, bad ass ‘Dr. Decker’ (I’m a huge fan of his too). I started thinking about all these collaborations as far as two writers and or directors, and I started thinking about my comment about Flanagan and ‘Pet Semetary’, so in flipping back and forth about which director might actually be better suited to do the project him or Muscietti, I settled on maybe if both would collaborate on it what a treat that would be! I then today came on here and read your comment and I just started smiling and thought how cool is that you said the same thing! Well then again great minds do think alike!

  • David

    The moonlight man freaked me out because everyone knows… you can’t fight the Moonlight.

    • Ocelot006 .

      Yeah you can fight the moonlight. It’s called curtains.

    • khail19

      omg how did this go unnoticed. *applauds* contemporary pop classics references are kinda random for this site.

  • ChowYunPhat

    I appreciate your argument, but I just can’t get on board with the ending. I get the reason for it symbolically, but the logical gymnastics that you have to go through to have any of it make sense are just too much to the point that it’s all pretty ridiculous. Doesn’t ruin the film, but it’s an info dump that just doesn’t add up and her catharsis really wasn’t dependent on it.

  • mikowilson

    Yeah. I just couldn’t disagree more. This movie, and Source Code are the two stories I wish I could unseen the last ten minutes of.
    I’ve never felt so let down by an otherwise great movie.
    I appreciate the attempt, but it just didn’t land for myself or my friends who watched it. The intent means diddly if the result is what I felt after watching that film.

    • krisp8888

      Well that is your opinion. I loved Source Code, and Source Codes’ ending. And I loved Gerald’s Game and Gerald’s Games’ ending!

      • mikowilson

        Wow. No way. It’s my opinion? No way! I thought I could just unilaterally decide what is a fact.
        You can like bad stuff all ya want. Go nuts. The ending to Source Code is widely panned because it’s terrible.
        Shocking, some people have terrible taste.

        • krisp8888

          Your comment is a contradiction. You act as if it is absurd that I would point out that your statement is simply your opinion, but you follow it with calling my opinion “terrible taste” and the stuff I like “bad stuff”, because you don’t like it. Your first comment came off with an arrogance of taking your and your friends’ opinion with a little too much weight. (“The intent means diddly if the result is what I felt after watching that film”) . Your feelings are irrelevant to the filmmakers intentions. It goes without saying that art is subjective. And the ending to Source Code was NOT widely panned. Some loved it, some hated it, many misunderstood it. Like Gerald’s Game it had a very divisive ending. But it was NOT widely panned. And the film (Source Code) to date holds a 92% on the Tomatometer. Thus I’d say my taste is in the majority, rather than the minority. 😉

          • mikowilson

            I already said I loved Source Code
            I also said I loved this movie.
            The endings, IN MY OPINION AND THE OPINION OF MANY, is stupid.
            Enjoy it if you want.
            Might also want to pick up some comprehension classes.

          • krisp8888

            Your comment did not give the impression of you loving either movie. You felt the endings were so bad that it caused you to feel “so let down”. Which is fine, just don’t try to discredit others’ opinions, the filmmakers’ intentions, or act as if almost everyone else feels the same way as you do, while if you look at any comment thread on this movie you will see the ratio split at least 50/50. Your opinion is the opinion of roughly 1/3. Mine belongs also to about 1/3. With the other 1/3 not feeling so strong about the ending. Hmm, I haven’t specifically seen any comprehension classes locally, but honestly I think you might be the one that needs to seek it out per your comments?…

          • mikowilson

            The impressions of 8 random people on a forum won’t represent anything close to a broad opinion on this movie. Google “The ending of Gerald’s Game is bad” and despair.

          • mikowilson

            http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/geralds-game-2017

            I don’t know about you, but the last paragraph of the Roger Ebert site review seems to think the ending is pure shit

            But you go ahead and stick with the review from bloody disgusting.

            It’s not like RogerEbert.com isn’t the most renowned reviewers ever, or something.

          • krisp8888

            Roger Ebert was. And he is my favorite critic of all time. But regardless you are taking ONE opinion again and propping it up. Who is Brian Tallerico? Never heard of him. Certainly not one of the “most renowned reviewers ever”.

          • mikowilson

            Google him, in fact, he is.
            Yes, one opinion from a source far more respected than a gore movie website.
            Sorry, opinions are not equal. Experts exist.

          • krisp8888

            What qualifies him to be an expert on the matter? I did Google him. He is far from one of the most renowned reviewers ever. Lol.

          • phAZE

            Even if he is… who cares?
            Reviewers are critics in disguise anyway.

          • Satanzilla

            Whatever that means.

          • phAZE

            I’m not explaining English to u. Again

          • Satanzilla

            Reviewers are not critics in disguise, moron. They’re just critics, period.

          • phAZE

            Ooh. Moron? wow. So u can use a dictionary now? (claps) …
            Now go find a complete set – and repeatedly bang yr head on it… Until i say stop. foh

          • Joel C

            Roger Ebert panned Blade Runner. He came out later in life and apologized for doing such a disservice to the film. People are just selfish and stupid to wish the ending was different. They don’t even understand that King wrote the whole book around building that scare at the end and realizing the chill that something was in the room with you so much of the time that you only though was a dream or delusion. That was the key to it being a HORROR book and not a typical Survival drama.

          • mikowilson

            I’m fine with the idea. I “got” that idea when she said the line “and they never did find the ring”
            The execution, in my opinion was just ludicrously ham fisted and . . Boring. It was like having someone explain why a joke they just told was funny.

          • krisp8888

            Googling “The ending of Gerald’s Game is bad” won’t be an accurate portrayal, that will just bring up results that match what my search is (which is that the ending is bad). Every single thread is split AT LEAST down the middle. This one included. And this thread has 45 comments to draw an average from – not 8.

          • krisp8888

            Also I did enjoy both films, and I am glad you loved them also 😉

          • Joel C

            The whole book Stephen King wrote after thinking up that ending. Everything was built around creating that scare at the ending and that realization it was real and in her room so much of the time. It’s a horror novel, not just a survival drama.

          • Satanzilla

            Horror does not need monsters. How old are you? Or are you just an adult high school dropout?

          • Joel C

            You’re just a troll looking for comments you can insult people about. I don’t know why I’m wasting time feeding a troll. Throwing a generalization about a person around doesn’t make it true. Who said horror has to have a monster? A horror film.. by genre. Does have to have certain horror elements making it a horror, and not some other Genre. Like a Thriller, or Drama, or Survival Story. There are things called Genres Classifications, so people can find the type of media they want to watch. King is brilliant at thinking up new scares for people to experience in different ways. What he did with Geralds game is not something done before. It was his idea to build the situation around presenting a specific type of scare which he pulled off wonderfully in the book. The movie.. not so much but it was OK. What you and some others wanted defeats the whole purpose of having created the story. Horror are full of contrivances that are sometimes stupid or don’t make sense all for created the mood and setup for the scare. The scare is the priority to horror often trumping common sense and reason. If done right, it’s worth the compromise. Like the first Halloween movie.

    • Satanzilla

      Yeah and Insidious as well, but I think like the last half hour of that one.

  • Bloodspatta

    The ending was brilliant and really did elevate this fantastic film. I want to rewatch now that I know the Moonlight Man is real.

  • Mr. Dry

    I was really impressed by pretty much the whole movie, Flanagan dealed with some really suspensful moments and he delievered. But that ending…. ugh. I know it’s in the books and it really feels like something that should have stayed there, the scene is not totally horrible and it’s a smart move for the story but the metaphor is a bit too on the audience’s nose with that last phrase and I personally feel that something more ambiguous would have worked much better.

  • Brandon Marshall

    The ending was a sloppy 10 minutes of nonstop exposition… very lazy and very poorly done.

    • Jimmy Cthulhuhan

      Said it before, but felt like something out of a hokey old movie-of-the-week. There was nothing good about it. Felt like it was something someone decided to add in post production on a whim.

      But I liked the rest of the movie.

  • Brandon Marshall

    Lazy and sloppy IMO

  • Olivia Meadows

    I agree with everything you wrote. I loved the ending! It was a nice twist like, wait, whaaaat!? HE WAS REAL lmao it made me laugh uncomfortably out of confusion and I sat there darting my eyes back and fourth trying to wrap my mind around it aha If he would’ve been only a mere figment of her imagination, it would’ve been a typical plot …. the fact that he was real and how weird and unlikely it is for him to have such a deformity just made it that much more enjoyable. The only thing I was left questioning was WHY he spared her and why he returned more than one night just to leave her be… Maybe he could see her struggle and for once felt some type of sympathy? Makes sense now as to why she gave him the ring.. He allowed her to overcome her fear, and though corny – I liked the empowered feeling of her last line ‘you’re so much smaller than I remembered’. Overall really good movie and I could feel every ounce of emotion, fear, fight, and flight. Great acting.

    • Satanzilla

      The actors did such an amazing job making the main story line so vividly real, but then there’s always that Kingian addition that is just a giant dump of bird guano all over the story. Kubrick was a sharp enough storyteller to know to rip all that crap out of The Shining and as a result he made one of the greatest horror movies ever.

      • Satanzilla

        And by the way I’m not a king hater. In fact I admire how he’s standing up for his country’s dignity at this crisis time. But his storytelling is so schizophrenic. Some of it is masterful, some of it is abysmal. A moviemaker has to be brave enough to ditch the abysmal and strengthen the masterful. Like Kubrick did.

  • gab ger gop

    Brilliant ending, I agree. Without that it would of just been a standard well crafted film. I have re-watched the ending a couple of times, without that ending I would of forgotten about this film pretty fast, people are just so used to standard films that they get angry when it tries something new, we deserve more Transformers movies and remakes for this particular reason.

  • Rob Rosado

    Agreed. The final 10 minutes turn it into something even more heartfelt and impressive.

  • Toni

    At first I thought it was also lazy exposition, an easy way to tie everything up. As someone who studied screenwriting we are, afterall, always told to show and not tell – but after reading this my opinion has changed. I didn’t know that the ending was something that happened in the book as I’ve never read it. Now that I know this, I do appreciate how it was adapted very closely to the source material, which I think is great. Plus the fact it always was a letter, I mean it is an ok way to tie up a story, let’s be honest.

  • Joel C

    I hated the way they portrayed the moonlight man. He wasn’t near as scarey as the way portrayed in the book. He’s so much more vague and not able to distinguish in the book. He blends into the shadows and you really don’t think it’s real. In the movie.. he’s just a big dumb lurch standing there. Not at all like the creepy thing described in the book. Also he’s not the Moonlight man.. Wasn’t he more like a Shadow man in the book? “You’re not real.. you’re just Shadows!” Wasn’t that what she said in the actual book?

    • Bludy_st00l

      “big dumb lurch”…i see what you did there…

  • Joel C

    You’re being lazy by not getting the real shiver the whole book was written for is the gut punch ending of realizing the thing in the room was not just her delusion which she firmly believed it was and you as the reader believe too. In the book.. the thing is much more vague and not so defined. Doesn’t look the same either. It has a much more gradual process of becoming more humanoid looking.

  • Joel C

    No. I like to be fooled into thinking the thing in the room is the all too typical delusion of her own mind like in every other story that’s been written like this, and then be totally surprised that the thing was real and actually in her room, which the book masterfully does this, and it’s why the story was considered unfilmable to begin with. It’s also what makes it a Stephen King Horror story and not something like a survival tragedy. Just quit reading horror if you don’t like it and stick to the drama section.

    • Satanzilla

      Ha ha you don’t get to define what’s horror or not — especially when your idea of horror is “Horror for Dummies.” I don’t know where you’ve been but in 99.9% of horror stories when you see a monster in your room guess what? — it’s real. The more novel approach is not to say it’s real and not to say it’s a figment of her imagination but to leave it up to the viewer.

      But guess what — you win! Most horror is made for the lowest of the lowbrow and so you tend to get your way. Most horror is stupid and obvious for all the nuniks who want/need everything spelled out for them all slow and patient. It’s only rarely that we get something REALLY good, REALLY sharp and thought provoking. Sadly we get the genre pics we deserve.

      • Joel C

        You don’t even know what a horror film is. I guess you think 127 Hours is a horror film? That’s what your saying would make this better. Name a movie or story where the adult is trapped and crazed/desperate and what he sees is real, all his delusions from famine or dehydration is actually real. There aren’t any. They always begin hallucinating and it takes different forms in different stories but it’s always the case. This is one story different. And why are you so damn condescending, arrogant and rude? Go back and read what you wrote. You just come off as an asshole acting superior. You may think your some pseudo intellectual because you think the idea of a delusion is so brilliant but you just can’t fathom worlds outside your little internal box but I doubt you even could be bothered to read the real book either. You don’t really understand the situation created and how the other ideas are presented. You just generalize it as some Schlocky meathead creature feature idea and your stuck in that mode of thinking. I’m sorry you see things in such black and white. You prefer to keep everything simple and banal.

        • Satanzilla

          lol you’re the asshole — you reply to me that I’m being “lazy” then you get your panties in a knot when I respond to you in kind? If you can’t stand the heat, stay out of the kitchen, silly boy.

          Your poor grammar and syntax and run-on sentences show you’re not very bright, but then again someone who loves movies in which everything is patiently explained to him isn’t, is he? Are you actually saying most horror movies have monsters that turn out not to be real but just the figment of the protagonists imagination? Just proving my point about you yet again.

          You are the reason most horror movies suck. You’re the poster boy for shitty and plebeian horror movies.

          • Joel C

            Ya keep thinking that with your strawman arguments. This wasn’t a monster movie and even something like It mostly had the kids hallucinating things that weren’t real. The monster was real but they never actually see It til the end. This movie is setup to be like I said 127 Hours.. and that’s all it would have been accept for the fact that for once, one of the Hallucinations was actually real. That’s the only thing that sets this apart from 127 hours or a movie like Buried or a bunch of other movies I could name but you can’t name any similar plots where the hallucination actually had a real malevolent force behind it. Who cares about my grammar on an internet post that I write as quick as possible. I don’t care about my grade as this is not a paper. It’s easy to understand and that is all that’s required. I convey my point.. you convey yours. That’s what these forums are for. Nothing more. You probably are one of those types that loved seeing IMDB forums dismantled because you couldn’t back up your illogical arguments and just made cheep shots about the others intelligence or grammar.

  • phAZE

    Yeah. I never said obscure. plus. U mean thesaurus. It’s actually a glossary of synonyms and antonyms. U dont get synonyms in a dictionary tard…
    but yeah keep talking!!!

  • phAZE

    Stupid enough to know a dictionary doesnt contain synonyms. Also. Who’s the dumbass who said they didnt understand basic English? hmm??? fohx2

  • phAZE

    Idiot. Dictionary.com has synonyms. A normal dictionary provides a definition – not similar examples – thats a thesaurus.
    I’m responding to a genius who didnt get my exact comment that a critic and a reviewer are the same. U can edit yr statements all u want. No -one thinks u look smart here. Emoji that

  • phAZE

    Not as stupid as u – obv.
    At least i dont need a dictionary to know what a critic or a reviewer is, or a synonym for that matter.
    Keep talking kid…
    Ps, yr emoji game is weak af

  • phAZE

    Did i review a single thing other than yr dumb ass statement? This from someone who doesnt even know what a dictionary is and who keeps asking the same fucking thing. I also said reviewers are critics… so u dumb af.
    I’ll break it down for the kiddy. A dictionary has word definitions – that’s it. No similar definitions (synonyms). A thesaurus is exactly that – a glossary (collection) of synonyms (similar) and antonyms (opposite)…
    now FOH fuctard – i’m not dropping anymore knowledge on a simple ass nobody who just wants to argue bs semantics (analysis of word meanings & implications)…
    Note* more emojis doesnt make yr point any more clear… so… go annoy ppl elseware.
    FYI there’s luggage at the airport that needs sniffing – FETCH!!!

  • Joel C

    I never called it a monster. Not once. Your arguments just run in circles recycling the same ad hominem responses. I’ve seen your type a million times and you really don’t like to discuss a topic. You just argue to argue and spit cheap insults. You’re asking how old I am? You’re the one with the name Satanzilla. If you were half my age, it would be forgivable the way you act online. But you probably are of age and that’s even worse. You should of grown out of this mentality back during the days of the BBS.. But you act like a Lamer Noob that just got into writing online. No sense of respect or wonder for anything. Just full of spite and bitterness, looking through your past comments.

    • Satanzilla

      Funny that you decry my ad hominem attacks when you began this interaction with “you’re being lazy…”. Like I already explained to you, if you’re too much of a special snowflake to bear being made fun of, don’t make fun of others. You seem basically talked out because you’re just having a hissy fit that the bad man said mean things about you. Can I get you a Gatorade? Sharing is caring. Meanwhile you’re a big fan of the dumbest and most obvious part of this movie, so mazeltov — people like you are the reason most horror sucks, the reason horror movie makers get out the crayons and draw the audience a picture, the reason Gugino gave a transcendent performance only to have this movie filed away as an unusually well acted genre pic with a dopey monster in it. As long as you’re happy, chief.

  • Bruce Wayne

    Well, in fact it really wasn’t a monster-movie. The main protagonist’s arc is about to realise that the “moonlight man” is in fact just a human being. A psychopath for sure, but nothing otherworldly. I understand your point of keeping it mysterious, but i wouldn’t call this movie a cheap monster-flick. Although the exposition-monologue in the end really wasn’t a great idea.

    • Satanzilla

      Sadly it is a monster movie, and actually it’s a rather insulting bit of ableist discrimination — he might not be a demon, or the creature from the black lagoon, but the story still links his physical challenges with his crimes. Despite the fact that she sees he’s not as scary as in her imagination, he’s still scary.

      • Bruce Wayne

        I wouldn’t say its discriminating people with physical disabilites. He committed these crimes because he is has a messed up mind. The fact that he is deformed is just a plot element, so that the audience believes he is a hallucination. Also i dont think he is scary at all. At least not for the main character. He is just focused on men, and didnt even thought she were a real person (“you are not real. You are only made of moonlight”). He wouldn’t have harmed her.

        • Satanzilla

          He has a man who’s physically scary doing scary things. Seems pretty obvious to me.

        • Satanzilla

          Well this is not a real person at all. It’s a character in a book. And King created the character and the character is an epic creeper whom King CHOSE to give those physical challenges. Not coincidentally.

          • Bruce Wayne

            If you think so.

  • Mysterio

    The last ten minutes absolutely ruined this movie.

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