Ghastly Real-Life Haunts Volume #1: Brunckow’s Cabin

B-D reader ‘Violator86′ e-mailed us offering to share with all of you random haunted locations across the world. Today we’ll take you to Cochise County, Arizona to Brunckow’s Cabin for the first edition of “Ghastly Real-Life Haunts”. Read on and tell us what we can do to make the next edition even better.

There was a place deep in the heart of Cochise County, Arizona that was like every Old West movie you’ve ever seen with gunfights, murder, and mayhem.

Just south of Charleston road and a mile or two east of the San Pedro River at least twenty-four men (seventeen of which were murdered before 1880) have been killed, It’s this spot that’s often referred to as “The bloody Brunckow Cabin.”

An article in the Arizona Democrat on May 20, 1891 wrote: “Many will tell you that the unquiet spirits of the departed ones are wont to revisit the glimpses of the moon and wander about the scene which witnesses their untimely taking off. The graves lie thick around the place.

Frederick Brunckow built this cabin a few years after he migrated from Germany in 1850, just ten years later in 1860 Brunckow would be murdered by a group of his workers. Legend has it Brunckow’s Mexican workers ran him through with his rock drill, and then threw him to the bottom of his mine.

One version is that a gentleman named William Williams, one of the only white men among the several Mexicans at the camp, went to Fort Buchanan for supplies in September of 1860. When he returned after dark, he discovered the gruesome remains of two of the white men in the cabin, one of which was his brother James Williams. Brunckow was later found dead at the bottom of his mine.

No one is really sure as to why the workers murdered these two men, maybe a dispute over labor, money, or power. The two men who were murdered there in cold blood surely wouldn’t be the last in this cabins blood covered history.

This spot in the southwestern part of Arizona is said to be filled with spirits of the dead, stuck in some sort of purgatory. Most reports seem to focus on ghostly and ghastly visions of gunslingers from the past still haunting these grounds, some people claim to hear a rock drill buzzing through the dark desert nights.

Most folk around the Cochise County area would much rather not talk about their deserts bloody past. People tend to get rather quiet when it’s brought up. Then there are some of the younger generations who’ve never heard about “The Bloody Brunckow Cabin”, who go out in search of it for cheap thrills.

Personal Experience: I’ve been to the Brunckow Cabin recently and I can say honestly, things get a little uncomfortable the moment you turn your car’s engine off.

It could be the darkness of night or being in the middle of nowhere but you can almost immediately feel an uneasiness creep up on you. Once you step out of the car, you want to get back in pretty quickly.

The noises in the desert are an easy suspect to blame for the noise reports that come along with tales of the cabin, but once you hear the faint noises of machinery running you tend to believe all the stories.

My belief? This area is officially haunted; don’t go here unless you’re really looking to get scared.