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What David Said To The Engineer In Theatrical Cut Of ‘Prometheus’ Only Part Of The Story

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Ridley Scott’s Prometheus, the Alien-ish prequel still in theaters from Twentieth Century Fox, isn’t going away any time soon. Or at least its echo isn’t dissipating. Love it, hate it or somewhere in between (and there are many folks on either side of that fence), people are continuing to talk about it.

One thing I hadn’t really given much thought to was what David said to the Engineer near the end of the film. I just sort of took for granted that it was something in their native language that the audience wasn’t intended to understand. But it turns out they developed a small portion of that language to use in the film.

Dr. Anil Biltoo of the SOAS Language Centre in London served as the linguistics consultant on the film and taught Michael Fassbender how to speak the line. He told The Bioscopist that tt translates to, “This man is here because he does not want to die. He believes you can give him more life.” This is of course a request on the behalf of the aging Peter Weyland. What’s more interesting is that Biltoo constructed an entire conversation – including a reply from the Engineer – that Ridley Scott filmed but ultimately cut from the film.

Per Biltoo, “We’re all going to have to wait for the Director’s cut to see if the conversation between the Engineer and David – and there was indeed originally a conversation, not merely an utterance from David.

There are whispers that there will be a subtitled version of the scene on the upcoming DVD/Blu-ray of the film. I have a pretty good theory on why the Engineers want to wipe out humanity, but for those who want a definitive answer – this scene may just provide it.

Source: The Bioscopist
  • djblack1313

    this IS pretty interesting but i don’t know if having the Engie say anything back to David et al. is a good move. the way it is now (the theatrical cut) this scene works IMO. the Engies want and are planning on killing us. they consider us insects and having the Engie “lower” himself to say anything to a species they find worthy of annihilating, at least as of now, diminishes the Engie.

    plus, is the brief discussion going to be calm (or would the Engie be yelling talking or talk in a very aggressive manner) and then after having a nice conversation with the Engie OUT OF NOWHERE he goes ballistic and kills everyone?

    at least the way it is now how the Engies feel about us humans matches how the Engie (at the end) wouldn’t lower himself to talk to us. his abrupt rampage/killing of the crew fits with what we know about the engies.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000031803851 Gavin Dobbs

    See Evan, now I just want to hear what your theory is.

  • zaglewiz

    I think the Engineer is going to say something along the lines of “your people made Marijuana Illegal so therefore you must die”. That’s what I want to believe anyways.

  • Indra

    Considering the movie, the conversation was probably about Jesus. I’m actually not kidding when I say that. We did something roughly two thousand years ago that served as a signal to the Engineers that our species was a failed experiment. I think that was the crucifixion. We probably learn in the (inevitable) sequel that Jesus was sent by the Engineers to lead us on a better path, to make humanity more moral and save its wicked and dangerous tendencies. He really was a “miraculous birth”, his conception the machination of the Engineers. But humanity killed him and so the Engineers deemed us beyond redemption. That’s why the entire conversation was cut, because I think that was the content of it. It would have explained too much and made a sequel unnecessary. I hope I’m wrong, because that would be stupid as hell. But I have a chilling feeling that I’m not.

    • Indra

      “save it FROM its wicked and dangerous tendencies.” I should never try to write this early in the morning.

    • zaglewiz

      Damn good insight. Although I myself don’t find it all that stupid “forgive me” I think that’s a pretty good idea to be honest that fits into the story in a weird way. I hope I worded that right hahahahah

  • Nothing333

    I wish the director, writer, etc would stop clarifying so many things in the film. I like the idea of open interpretation and the mystery behind it. David Lynch doesnt sit down and explain every part of his movie to audiences who didn’t get it and neither should these guys.