Advance Review: Planetoid #3

planetoid3

The third installment of Image Comics and Ken Garing’s Planetoid hits shelves this week, adding a much needed human element to the arc. Garing’s sporadic use of dialogue has thus far allowed the art of his comic to define the mood; bleak swathes of metallic wasteland dominated almost every panel of the first 2 issues, giving the comic a pervasive hopelessness. However, with Silas’ help, the ragtag group of survivors undergo a stunning transformation. Read on for the skinny…

WRITTEN BY: Ken Garring
ART BY: Ken Garring
PUBLISHER: Image Comics
RELEASE: August 22nd, 2012

What makes this issue of “Planetoid” so strikingly different from the others is the presence of sky. Silas climbed what is known as “the Slab” in issue #2. This ascent changes the entire perspective of the comic, allowing Silas to no longer be dwarfed by the mechanical wasteland, as he can now see an unsullied horizon. The art from issue 1 and issue 3 are perfect to juxtapose against each other. Whereas in issue #1 Silas was being crushed by his environment, fighting for survival, he has now mastered it and is yearning for something more. This yearning can be summarized by a quote from the former presidential candidate, Herman Cain, as he addresses humanity when confronted by a fictitious alien invasion, “Citizens of Earth: It was the spirit of humanity that built this planet. It is that same spirit of humanity that will allow us to defend ourselves against unknown enemies. It is that same spirit of humanity that will allow us to destroy the aliens!” (Daily Show, April 2012).

My favorite part of “Planetoid” are the full page panels. In this issue Garing takes a full page to depict a solitary, lazy kite flying in the sky. This image, which appears near the end of the issue, is symbolic of the “spirit of humanity,” linking perspective, the sky and hope inextricably . Of course this all comes crashing down on the last page of the comic, setting up the confrontation between Silas and the evil robots. The introduction of beauty was short lived in “Planeotid,” but a much needed addition. The reader has seen that Silas is no mere survivalist, and that he now has something to fight for besides himself. I can’t wait for what will surely be a stunning conclusion in the next 2 issues of “Planetoid”.

4/5 skulls

Reviewed by theSandman