Review: ‘Blackacre’ #6

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Blackacre #6 is essentially the exposition of how Greene became the leader of the religious cult occupying the dystopian American wasteland the series is set in. Taking place two years prior to the events of the previous issues, it does a good job – though certainly not a perfect one – in showing how Greene, a sane man by any means, joins and comes to lead a group of homicidal fanatics when Hull reunites with him two years later.

WRITTEN BY: Duffy Boudreau
ART BY: Wendell Cavalcanti
PUBLISHER: Image Comics
PRICE: $2.99
RELEASE: May 1st, 2013

Packing two years of plot into a single issue isn’t easy work, but for the most part Boudreau manages to make it work. There’s not an extensive amount of dialogue, but that’s alright; what’s there is what’s necessary. A consequence of this is that many characters – besides Greene and Bird – aren’t developed at all, and serve to simply fulfill the intended trajectory of the plot. However, since most of these characters aren’t going to be making any future appearances, this isn’t such a bad thing.

If there is one thing that sticks out as awkward, it’s Greene’s “revelation” moment during his brief imprisonment. On one hand, it provides a logical impetus for Greene to, ironically, abandon strict logic in favor of faith. On the other, it’s confusing in its execution – Greene closes his eyes and suddenly trips harder than all but the most experienced stoners? In a comic where cynicism justifiably reigns supreme, this leap of faith is out of place. Perhaps by design.

Regardless, it’s a necessary moment. And while the rest of the content is somewhat breezy, it still tells an interesting story. The art is, as usual, up to the task. There are some missteps here and there – Bird’s face right before he escapes is a little weird – but it’s the strong, unassuming aesthetic you’ve come to expect by now. Strong and unassuming is probably the best way to describe “Blackacre” for the moment, and this issue continues that streak.

3.5/5 Skulls

Reviewed by – GeorgeShunick