[Review] The Elkcloner ‘The Elkcloner’

elkclonercover
The Elkcloner is the brainchild of Serbian/New York composer Filip Mitrovic, who co-scored Resident Evil: Afterlife as well as The Echo and Sleep Dealer. With this self-titled debut album, Mitrovic has put out an album that tackles multiple genres using only live recordings, no samples whatsoever. Also featured on the album is Rose Colella, a Chicago-based jazz vocalist. Do all these components work in application or would it have been better left on paper?

I’m the type of guy who fiddles with the radio tuner knob a lot. I’ve been told I have music ADHD, which might very well be the case. But the things is that if I get to the part of the song I want to hear, I feel like I don’t need to listen to the rest of the song. Yes, there are countless songs where I want to hear the whole thing, but they’re not really radio material, y’know what I mean?
Perhaps that’s why I enjoyed The Elkcloner so much. From one song to another I couldn’t anticipate what I would be hearing. Would it be a song that sounds like an homage to the 60’s and 70’s spy spoof films with a dash of Cold War-era sci-fi movie whistling (The Green Dune)? Would it be a dark noir jazz track that had 50’s Motown doo wop singers (Crossfire)? How about the final track, Lonely View, which I can only describe by having you picture a scenario: a lonely waif girl rests her heads on her arms across the side of a gondola as it floats through the canals of Venice. She is on a trip to find her family/pet/wish/[insert whatever Disney tribulation fits] and this is the song that she sings.
See, that’s what makes this album so fun. I didn’t know what was coming next, which is actually rather rare and strange if you think about it. After all, when you buy an album, you think you know what you’re getting into, right? If I were to go and buy a new In Flames album, I would expect Swedish melodic death metal. If I bought a Taylor Swift album, I would expect pop country. But this album kept me on my toes throughout. 
For the horror enthusiasts, there is Annabel Lee, which gently alters the poem of the same name by Edgar Allen Poe and places it on top of a psychedelic 60’s pop track. It’s rather infectious and a very clever way to take a heart wrenching, eerie poem and give it an interesting spin. 
The Final Word: While at first listen, The Elkcloner might seem like an album stricken with ADHD, a few listens will clear everything up. This album is incredibly fun and well worth your time. 
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