The Baby

What was the last movie that made you sit there, mind blown, jaw hanging, muttering ‘awesome’ from the final twist?

The Baby has done this to me.

Ann Gentry is an everyday, good hearted social worker. Recently having lost her husband in a car accident, she has sought specific cases to work on to occupy her time. A particular case that she’s been drawn to is the Wadsworth family. If the household just consisted of Mrs. Wadsworth and her daughters Alba and Germaine, one wouldn’t understand why they’d need visits from social services. However, throw in Baby, and things get complicated. Because Baby isn’t a baby. Baby is 21 years old.

Clad in diapers and sucking on bottles, David Mooney’s portrayal of Baby is insane. Moments where he is crying are downright creepy. Ann’s interest in Baby and his family’s care for him keep the viewer on the borderline thought of if there are indeed sexual undertones. Yet, Ann’s interest in trying to assimilate Baby into behaving appropriately for his age dismiss this idea. Perhaps the Wadsworth family has been negligent in their treatment of Baby, but any mother can be seen as overprotective of their child in some light, right? Ruth Roman as Mrs. Wadsworth rivals Faye Dunaway as Joan Crawford in Mommie Dearest, however wire hangers are kicked up a notch, being replaced with a cattle prod.

Soon enough, Ann is accepted by the Wadsworths and becomes somewhat of a staple in Baby’s life. She helps feed him, play with him and comforts him in times of need. But after a party for Baby’s birthday turns sour, and Ann ends up tied and gagged in the basement, do we see just how overprotective the Wadsworth clan is. After Ann escapes, she devises a plan to save Baby from their torment – yet one question remains:

Why does Ann have such an obsession with Baby? What exactly is her ultimate goal?

In the end, the insane final revelation scene sends explosions through one’s brain and turns it to jello.

And all you can say is ‘Awesome.’

Official Score